DIY: Trailer Bearing Maintenance - GSXR.com
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post #1 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 09:18 AM Thread Starter
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Exclamation DIY: Trailer Bearing Maintenance

I bought a used 2008 Carry-On 4x7 open trailer. Great condition, and for a great price. Since i didnt know if anyone has maintained the trailer since its birth in 2008, i figured id start taking a look around. I lubed up the front support leg in front. I lubed the coupler. checked the lights and lubed the lift gate.
THEN I DUG INTO THE WHEEL BEARINGS, AND FOUND THE FILTH. Im going to do a quick instruction on a how-to for checking, changing, cleaning & repacking your trailer bearings.
PUT ON RUBBER GLOVES! THIS WILL BE NASTY & MESSY!!!

1. start by chocking the wheels on your trailer, and lifting up one wheel at a time your going to work on. i chose right under the suspension and lifted up the trailer till the wheel is spinning freely. Its only 350lbs, so it stayed put. if you have a much heaver trailer you might want to lift the from the frame. UNBOLT YOUR WHEEL BY REMOVING THE LUG-NUTS.

2. YOU WILL HAVE JUST THE HUB LEFT. take a screw driver and pry off the silver dust cap. you might need a large pliers or something if its been in there for years.



3. next once your remove your dust cap, you will see this. take a small pair of pliers and straighten the legs out on the cotter pin and pull it out.



4. once you remove the cotter pin, the castle nut should unscrew easily. these should not be tight. (to tight and you cause damage to the bearings)

5. now you can remove your HUB from the spindle. it will slide off, and the OUTER most bearing might pop out easily. totally normal, dont worry.


6. inspect your bearings & the grease thats in there now. is it milky? murky? watery? rusty/browish?/ did you find metal junks loose? clean the outer bearing and parts and inspect for rust. SET IT ASIDE CLEARLY REMEMBERING THAT THIS IS THE OUTER MOST. (some trailer use 2 different sizes for outer/inner)
HERE IS WHAT I FOUND:




7. AFTER YOU REMOVE THE OUTER BEARING, you will need to remove the inner bearings that sit closest to the center of the trailer. you can take a piece of wood, or something similar and GENTLY tap out the bearing and the seal thats holding it in. You will almost positively damage the inner seal. its a given, best to pre-order your new bearings & seals.


8. inspect your bearings & the grease thats in there now. is it milky? murky? watery? rusty/browish?/ did you find metal junks loose? clean the inner bearing and parts and inspect for rust. inspect the seal. is the rubber torn? is it worn down? is it rusty? is it bent?AGAIN, TAKE THE TIME TO INSPECT, CLEAN, AND PLACE ASIDE REMEMBERING WHICH IS WHICH.

9. IF EVERYTHING IS FINE - GO AHEAD AND CLEAN ALL YOUR PARTS AGAIN MAKING SURE EVERYTHING IS IN GOOD CONDITION. CLEAN EVERYTHING INCLUDING THE SPINDLE. AFTER YOU CLEAN THE BEARING, INSPECT FOR GROVES, DINGS, OR MISSING ROLLERS. ROLLS THE BEARING AND LISTEN...is it making a rusty roller skate wheel noise? does it sound like it has sand inside?
SIDE NOTE: bearings are cheap. go to etrailer.com and order a new set for both side. thats what i did. etrailer.com BEARING KIT ORDERING CHART this chart makes things a lot easier.
on the bearing itself will be the words CHINA written on it, and then a long part number (example)L44649(thats mine). "L44649" is going to be your bearing part number. that's what you find on that chart, and order. its like $10/wheel. cheap enough to just replace versus risk loosing a wheel.




10. If you feel that your parts ok, or if you got new ones: you will need a bucket of disk drum/wheel bearing grease. any pep-boys or auto parts store has it for $5 or less.

11. take a glob and rub your spindle liberally. rub the inside of the hub, and rub your bearings. rub everything in the hub with grease. dont be cheap.

take a nice glob into your palm and force the grease INTO the bearing crevasses. (thats called packing your bearing)
DO THIS TO BOTH BEARINGS.
GET AS MUCH GOOPS INTO IT SO TO BLOCK WATER OUT.

once you feel you have shoved as much grease INTO the rear bearing reinstall THE REAR BEARING into the rear race on your hub. add more grease, and seal with the rear seal all onto the hub.

12. now install the hub onto the spindle. install your outer bearing into the race, add more grease and washer(if you have one) shoving more grease into the area.

13. handle tighten the castle nut till its snug. back out one millimeter at a time till the hole is aligned for the NEW cotter pin.

14. pack some more grease, and seal with your dust cap
(i like to fill the dust cap with about 50% full of grease to have a nice water tight seal so water has no where to go if it does enter.


PHOTO CREDITS(along with my photo's):
Replacing the Bearing, Races and Seals on a Trailer Hub | etrailer.com
Repacking Trailer Wheel Bearings | The Family Handyman

Last edited by ImStricken; 01-18-2012 at 09:33 AM.
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post #2 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 09:20 AM Thread Starter
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REFERENCE GUIDE:

(NOTE: I DID NOT COVER HOW TO REPLACE THE RACER'S BECAUSE IN SOME IT TAKES A PRESS TO GET THEM BACK IN. IF YOUR RACERS FALL OUT OF THE HUB EASILY , ITS TIME TO GET A NEW HUB.) If you order from etrailer.com the new kit, it will come with new 2 new race's per wheel. they are pushed into the hub. you can bang them out- but i did not cover that in this write-up. they are the shiny disk the bearing sits in.
IF YOU WANT TO KNOW HOW TO GET THEM OUT = FLAT HEAD SCREW DRIVER AND A HAMMER AND SOME PATIENT NEIGHBORS.
GETTING THEM BACK IN ISNT MUCH EASIER. good luck lol
SOME GUYS USE A RATCHET SOCKET THAT JUST FITS & CLEARS THE HUB, AND BANG ON THE SOCKET TO PUSH THE RACE OUT.


I WAS REMINDED BY TRAILERPRO(you can find him on here, very knowledgeable guy)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trailerpro View Post
EZ-Lube axles. you can repack your bearings with a grease gun via the zerk on the end of your spindle.


YOUR GOING TO HEAR POPPING AND FARTING, THATS JUST THE GREASE PUSHING OUT AIR POCKETS.
WHEN YOUR DONE, CHECK BEHIND TO MAKE SURE THE SEAL IS STILL SITTING RIGHT.

Last edited by ImStricken; 01-19-2012 at 10:30 AM.
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post #3 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 09:34 AM
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Well done
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post #4 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 09:49 AM
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Very well done indeed. I think you placed it in a fitting section like we talked about, and I feel this is just as important as the preparing for a track day thread and so I stuck it at the top for ya.

Think about it ppl, you maintain your bike, but if you do not your trailer then you could loose the bike!



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post #5 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 10:01 AM
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Well done Sir. Great pictures too.

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post #6 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 10:06 AM Thread Starter
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thanks guys- im really big into maintenance on anything that has a license plate(at least used too).
$20 for new bearings, and 1 hour of work = piece of mind knowing its one less thing keeping me from an enjoyable track day.

"It aint much of a track bike if you cant get it to the track"- is this threads tag-line lol
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post #7 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 11:03 AM
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post #8 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 11:24 AM Thread Starter
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Thats a great product, but bearings are a (made in china) wear item, and still need to be changed at least once a year(depending on usage).
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post #9 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 11:28 AM
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Thats a great product, but bearings are a (made in china) wear item, and still need to be changed at least once a year(depending on usage).
I like them cause its easier to keep them greased. and less grease fling

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post #10 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 02:52 PM
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Once a year? Wow, I am a decade late, with no problems. Just keep them lubed, and they can last just fine. Cars can go 100,000 to 200,000 miles on wheel bearings without problems. I call BS.
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post #11 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 07:57 PM Thread Starter
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Once a year? Wow, I am a decade late, with no problems. Just keep them lubed, and they can last just fine. Cars can go 100,000 to 200,000 miles on wheel bearings without problems. I call BS.
no need to call BS.
you cant compare trailer bearings to car bearings. two totally different bearings.

1. trailer wheels are smaller = so they rotate more often than a car wheel will(so will a bearing). traveling the same speed at its tow vehicle, the trailer bearings will rotate more often during the coarse of the trip = THUS CREATING MUCH MORE HEAT!(causing faster wear)

2. car bearings are totally different. car bearings are sealed unlike typical trailer bearings that have Unsealed Bearings hub bearings. car bearings often are BALL bearings, while trailer bearings are ROLLER bearings. lets not get into indestructible ceramic ball bearings that some cars have.
BALL bearings have a smaller contact patch than ROLLER bearings, thus roller bearings create much more heat!

3. trailer bearings have to have more play than car bearings = thus allowing more clearance for water or dirt to enter the bearings and race.

4. boat bearings get completely submerged into water- unlike most cars.

5. many manuals to trailers even tell you do clean, inspect, re-grease twice a year!

6. almost everyone who tows, ends up carrying an extra hub & bearings with them, simply because these f-ing things go so quickly, and often. and then having to find help is BEYOND hard and super expensive.

its your trailer, its your load on the trailer.
if you want to learn your lesson the hard way by thinking the sh!t you own is indestructible or in better condition than it is, do so. but dont come on here and spew your "duct-tape repairman" rhetoric. go do some research, read some other forums, and look into the maintenance trailers have set-up from their manufacturers. almost all call for complete disassemble and repacking the bearings twice per year.

My carry-on trailer manual quoted: "If your trailer has not been used for an extended amount of time, have the bearings inspected and packed more frequently, at least every six months and prior to use"
"If a trailer wheel bearing is immersed in water, it must be replaced"

Last edited by ImStricken; 01-18-2012 at 08:02 PM.
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post #12 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 08:05 PM
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Couple things I'd like to point out here:

- Unless you have a center cap covering your hub, you can do this without taking off the wheel/tire. It's actually easier to get the bearings/races/seal out with it still mounted to the wheel. You can also use a claw hammer to get the seal out (yeah it's gonna trash it, but I always use a new one).

- If you replace your bearings, replace your races! It is also important to clean and inspect your races also. If you see pitting or discoloring (gold color) you should change them. Main rule is if you can feel an imperfection in the race with your fingernail, replace it. You can get them in/out without a hydraulic press. Take a hammer and a flat punch (or a 1/2" piece of cold rolled steel about 12" long which is easier) and after the bearings are removed, hit one side of the race. Then go directly across and hit the other side. Continue this and "walk" the race out. When putting the new race in, do this in reverse. It is an interference fit, so it will take a little muscle.

- Bearing buddies are designed for boat trailers. When you are driving down the road, your grease heats up and expands. When this happens, it pushes the spring-loaded piece outward. When you back down in the water, the grease cools very quickly and contracts creating a vacuum. The spring pushes the grease back into the hub instead of allowing it to draw in water from the back of the hub through the seal. Even with bearing buddies on, the bearings should still be inspected for wear about once a year.

- When putting the spindle nut back on, it should be tightened down with a wrench (or channel locks) to about 50 ft/lbs - good grunt with one arm - then backed off and Finger tightened. If the cotter key won't go in always back it off to the next available slot, NEVER put this nut on tighter than finger tight. You bearings expand/shrink with heat from running down the road and if the nut is to tight, it will cause premature failure. Always double-check yourself when the wheel/tire/hub is back together by checking the bearing lash with your hands. Grab the tire at the bottom and top (6 and 12 o'clock) and push/pull from top to bottom. You should barely feel movement in the hub - about 1/16" of play.

- Lastly, It is better to pack your bearings at the end of the off-season (if you have one). When a trailer sits for a long period of time, the bearing roller is sitting against the race. This can create a rust line just from humidity/moisture in the air. When you use it after sitting for a while, this rust line starts to wear the bearings/races creating pits and eventually leads to bearing failure.

Hope this helps!

Last edited by Trailerpro; 01-19-2012 at 06:15 AM.
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post #13 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 08:13 PM
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Once a year? Wow, I am a decade late, with no problems. Just keep them lubed, and they can last just fine. Cars can go 100,000 to 200,000 miles on wheel bearings without problems. I call BS.
Cars are a completely different animal. The weight load of a car never changes (unless you are a complete fat ass) unlike a trailer. They also have different style bearings in most vehicles. I have a huge pile of ruined axles at my shop from people who think they never need to check them...but I'm not complaining

One thing I do agree with is that with Proper maintenance, good bearings can last 100,000 miles if not over-loaded. Notice I said good bearings, not just bearings. The chinese bearings do wear out quicker, and don't take the abuse/heat that other bearings do. Most car manufacturers use Temkin, etc. not Chinese bearings from the lowest bidder.
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post #14 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 08:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trailerpro View Post
The weight load of a car never changes (unless you are a complete fat ass) unlike a trailer.


Is it good to just check and repack the bearings every other year or so?...Thats what I have done anyway, with bike trailers, horse trailers etc...
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post #15 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 08:31 PM
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Is it good to just check and repack the bearings every other year or so?...Thats what I have done anyway, with bike trailers, horse trailers etc...
Really depends on how often you use the trailer, the load of it, and the distances traveled. Dexter Axle recommends every 12 months/12,000 miles. On my personal trailers, I do my utility about every 2 years and my boat trailers (have little 12' boat and a 18 1/2' bass boat) twice a year, but they are used a lot! When I take my little boat to the pond, the trailer just stays in the water all day when I'm fishing. This makes them wear out VERY quickly due to the amount of water in the hubs. My utility only gets used about once or twice a month and doesn't see very heavy loads, so I don't really worry about them as much.
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post #16 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 09:35 PM
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Great thread. Should be a sticky. Also, don't forget to use good lube . sorry, I couldn't resist from saying that. But seriously, thanks for posting this up.
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post #17 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-18-2012, 09:56 PM
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. Should be a sticky.
Ummmmmm it is, lol.



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post #18 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 05:08 AM
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its $20 freakin bucks to replace a single axle of 4 bearings & 4 race's. thats an hour of work, to an hour in a half at most. i cant believe people like zippy even have the gall to try and extent the service life of these throw-away parts.

makes me wonder if zippy still wears his 6th grade buzz lightyear undies?
Why replace them, he's a decade late, with no problems. Just keep them lubed, and they can last just fine. LOL
I have the gall to not replace parts that are not in need of replacement? Uh, yeah.

First, someone commented that car wheel bearings are ball bearings? What?? They are roller bearings. They are the same as trailer bearings. What car has ball bearings in the wheels???

Is that true, because I have never seen a car bearing that is a ball bearing?

Second, why keep changing out parts when you can just maintain what you have? That would be a waste of money and time.

Third, between the tow vehicle and the trailer, it is the trailer who's bearings have the easiest job. The trailer is just coasting in most cases, and in most cases has less load and less weight on the bearings than the tow vehicle does.

Lastly, we are not talking about boat trailers that have the axles submerged in water.

And why would trailer bearings need more clearance than car wheel bearings? Really? Convince me.

Maybe my good luck for years with trailer bearings has to do with my use of Bearing Buddies, which keep them lubed. So, why don't you try those? They seem to help you avoid all this extra unneeded work. I don't repack them, because I found a $10-12 solution that keeps them lubed in the first place. No rust, no lack of lube, no disassembly, no repacking.

I've got better things to do with my time than waste it unnecessarily replacing parts because I didn't maintain them.

Last edited by Zippy; 01-19-2012 at 05:55 AM.
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post #19 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 05:21 AM
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The weight of a car never changes? What on earth would that have to do with the stress on the bearings in a practical way? So the car has a heavy load all the time, and a trailer doesn't. How does a lighter load cause the trailer bearings to suffer in any way?

Replacing twice a year might be appropriate for boat trailers left in the water all day, but should not be needed for anyone else.
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post #20 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 06:07 AM
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And why would trailer bearings need more clearance than car wheel bearings? Really? Convince me.

I was offering my advice and knowledge. If you don't want to take it, don't. I explained the proper way to set the lash on a trailer, unless you have a 10k Alko, which uses 0 lash. If you just want to fact check, call Dexter Axle (largest/best axle manufacturer in the nation).

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The weight of a car never changes? What on earth would that have to do with the stress on the bearings in a practical way? So the car has a heavy load all the time, and a trailer doesn't. How does a lighter load cause the trailer bearings to suffer in any way?
Never said the lighter load causes anything to suffer...It's called engineering and tolerances. Car manufacturers use a bearing capable of carrying a much larger load than the weight of the vehicle. Basically (making this really simplified) like using a 7k axle to carry around 1500 lbs. all the time. The bearings don't get near as hot as they do on a loaded trailer. On top of that, MOST people overload their trailers, which causes premature bearing failure also.

Would you like a pic of my axle pile? I probably have about 50 axles from the last few months that I have changed due to people not maintaining their bearings...yes, even ones with bearing buddies.

Quote:
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Replacing twice a year might be appropriate for boat trailers left in the water all day, but should not be needed for anyone else.
That's what I said earlier...

On a side note, grease breaks down over time (when used) just like oil. I know people that don't change the oil/transmission fluid/etc. in their vehicles but they still run for years. Doesn't mean I'm going to do the same, or if I did that I would get the same results. Again, it doesn't bother me at all if you can get away with running them for years and don't check them. You are the minority.

Last edited by Trailerpro; 01-19-2012 at 06:11 AM.
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post #21 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 06:18 AM Thread Starter
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I was offering my advice and knowledge. If you don't want to take it, don't. I explained the proper way to set the lash on a trailer, unless you have a 10k Alko, which uses 0 lash. If you just want to fact check, call Dexter Axle (largest/best axle manufacturer in the nation).
NO SENSE IN TRYING TO CONVINCE HIM. OBVIOUSLY HE THINKS HE KNOWS MORE THAN SOMEONE WHO SELLS, FIXES, AND WORKS WITH TRAILERS(you).
HE OBVIOUSLY KNOWS BETTER THAN THE MANUALS THAT ARE WRITTEN BY TRAILER MANUFACTURERS. HE OBVIOUSLY KNOWS BETTER THAN THE THOUSANDS OF OTHER FORUMS POSTERS WHO MAINTAIN TRAILERS THE PROPER WAY. THINGS IN HIS HEAD MAKE A LOT MORE SENSE THAN THE ENGINEERING, PHYSICS, AND COMMON SENSE THAT WE SPEAK OF.

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post #22 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 06:32 AM
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And they are called bearing races. Not racers. Races.

Trailer Pro, thanks for the info and advice.

Last edited by Zippy; 01-19-2012 at 06:57 AM.
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post #23 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 06:42 AM
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And yet, my bearings seem to magically last longer than yours.

And they are called bearing races. Not racers. Races.
Zippy....Zip it.

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post #24 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 07:01 AM
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Really depends on how often you use the trailer, the load of it, and the distances traveled. Dexter Axle recommends every 12 months/12,000 miles. On my personal trailers, I do my utility about every 2 years and my boat trailers (have little 12' boat and a 18 1/2' bass boat) twice a year, but they are used a lot! When I take my little boat to the pond, the trailer just stays in the water all day when I'm fishing. This makes them wear out VERY quickly due to the amount of water in the hubs. My utility only gets used about once or twice a month and doesn't see very heavy loads, so I don't really worry about them as much.
Good to know, and thanks
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post #25 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 07:07 AM
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An argument over trailer bearing maintenance, really? I would argue with anyone of what gloves to wear or how fat their mother is, but trailer axle bearings...really? Put on a happy face and lets get some trailer bearing communication going... stifle the hate k, thanks.
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post #26 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 07:20 AM
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I should not have attacked the way I did. I apologize for spoiling a thread that ImStricken took some real effort to create and has some good information in it. I should have phrased my criticisms in a more gentle way so that people could take them for what they were worth without getting distracted by the confrontational tone that I took.
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post #27 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 07:26 AM
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I should not have attacked the way I did. I apologize for spoiling a thread that ImStricken took some real effort to create and has some good information in it. I should have phrased my criticisms in a more gentle way so that people could take them for what they were worth without getting distracted by the confrontational tone that I took.
Onwards and upwards, thank you
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post #28 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 07:28 AM Thread Starter
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I should not have attacked the way I did. I apologize for spoiling a thread that ImStricken took some real effort to create and has some good information in it. I should have phrased my criticisms in a more gentle way so that people could take them for what they were worth without getting distracted by the confrontational tone that I took.
i went back and removed my childish remarks, as i too attacked.

its not about making things 'gentle' for us - as criticizing people who follow SOP's and strict maintenance schedules. the reason i jumped is, i made a thread on PROPER maintenance on a trailers' bearings, without the 'set it & forget' mentality. i didnt want a rookie to come in here change his bearings and never touch them again because someone(zippy) has had great luck in not changing his bearings in over a decade. thats all it is.
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post #29 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 07:35 AM Thread Starter
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i went back and removed my childish remarks
ok, one last one LOL/jk
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post #30 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 07:42 AM
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Awesome!
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post #31 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-19-2012, 07:51 AM Thread Starter
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hey zippy, if you want- post pics and any info in the LETS TALK: TRAILER maintenance, setup, restraints, etc thread. im trying to get as much info as possible in there.

when i was shopping for a trailer, i knew i would utilize the pit-bull trailer restraint system but didnt know whats the smallest size of trailer would fit everything. the more info we can get in there, the better for anyone new shopping around.
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post #32 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-26-2012, 09:59 AM
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I have a Chariot 5' by 6' utility trailer and was going to do my bearings when the weather warms up. Where is a good place to buy wheel seals and bearings if I need them? Are most bearings and seals standard sizes meaning I wouldn't have to get them directly from Chariot? Even if I have to spend a little more, I would prefer quality stuff.
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post #33 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-26-2012, 11:23 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by CraigStevens View Post
I have a Chariot 5' by 6' utility trailer and was going to do my bearings when the weather warms up. Where is a good place to buy wheel seals and bearings if I need them? Are most bearings and seals standard sizes meaning I wouldn't have to get them directly from Chariot? Even if I have to spend a little more, I would prefer quality stuff.
since many trailers are different, my best advice is take one side apart and look at your bearings. on the bearing will be a number.
use that number to order yourself a kit from etrailer.com.
ETRAILER.COM BEARING KIT CHART


on your bearing & seal will be a laser etched number similar to how this looks like:
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post #34 of 41 (permalink) Old 01-26-2012, 08:44 PM
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Cool. Thanks, that's what I thought.
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post #35 of 41 (permalink) Old 03-05-2012, 10:33 AM
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I just cleaned my harbor freight trailer, regreased it with red synthetic stuff, and it's cool to the touch after 200 miles.

It makes a big difference. The last thing you want to do is be stuck somewhere on the side of the road!
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post #36 of 41 (permalink) Old 03-17-2012, 04:52 AM
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Make sure to check your lug nuts! I almost lost a wheel because I didn't. Ruined a wheel and three wheel studs. It was easy to fix since I realized it before the wheel actually came off.

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post #37 of 41 (permalink) Old 04-16-2012, 08:33 AM Thread Starter
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SO AFTER TEST DRIVING MY TRAILER WITH THE BIKE this weekend i took a 20min trip to the local gas station and put my hand on the hub to check the temps. Felt warm, just above luke warm seems to be running fine. i wanted to post on here for other to check their hubs as often as possible to avoid damage while doing 65mph with your precious cargo on the trailer:

As long as the grease isn't melting and flinging = you are ok.
Expect temps to run up to around 120.

90-110 is normal. the side with the sun exposure is going to get hotter - dont forget.

If you have brakes on your trailer here are the numbers:
180-200 normal
250 o-rings fail in covers
300 seals fail

AND REMEMBER = "The faster you drive, the hotter your bearings will get". And the high heat is what breaks down seals, which causes grease to leak, which leads to bearings to over heat & seize and that causes you to be stranded.

Last edited by ImStricken; 04-16-2012 at 08:47 AM.
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post #38 of 41 (permalink) Old 04-16-2012, 09:19 AM
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Is putting larger tires on an option to reduce bearing speed and therefore heat?


Sent from my front left pocket. It's dark in here.

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post #39 of 41 (permalink) Old 04-16-2012, 10:05 AM Thread Starter
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Is putting larger tires on an option to reduce bearing speed and therefore heat?

Sent from my front left pocket. It's dark in here.
what?
i didnt see what you wrote all i saw was TITS lol
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post #40 of 41 (permalink) Old 04-16-2012, 10:10 AM Thread Starter
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Is putting larger tires on an option to reduce bearing speed and therefore heat?
oh sorry - lol
yes installing larger tires/rims will work, but MAKE SURE YOU USE TRAILER TIRES ONLY! (car tires are not an option because they are not rated to hold that much weight.)

Installing larger tires & rims that will equate to the total width of the towing vehicle's tires & rims is going to be tough since we drive suvs & trucks often. and your trailer might have fenders that will get in the way.
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