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Old 08-09-2009, 03:06 AM   #1
505gsxr
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Default chain adjustment

whats the worst thing that can happen if you over tighten the chain.
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Old 08-09-2009, 03:41 AM   #2
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It breaks while you're riding causing you to crash and get injured or die...but that's just worst case senerio
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Old 08-09-2009, 03:43 AM   #3
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+1 on DEATH.
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Old 08-09-2009, 07:34 AM   #4
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of course it won't do your wheel bearings or counter shaft bearings any good either. could also stress or crack the engine cases.

or you might die and never know

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Old 08-09-2009, 07:58 AM   #5
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if you dont know mabey you should not be riding a bike
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Old 08-09-2009, 08:13 AM   #6
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I think he may have been talking about the worst thing to happen to the bike. Death can happen to anyone at anytime for no apparent reason at all.

As far as mechaincal issues to the bike I would say +1 to the chain breaking, and if it doesnt break IM sure it would be eating away at you sprockets until they dont have enough teeth to turn the chain any longer.
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Old 08-09-2009, 09:35 AM   #7
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Quote:
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I think he may have been talking about the worst thing to happen to the bike. Death can happen to anyone at anytime for no apparent reason at all.

As far as mechaincal issues to the bike I would say +1 to the chain breaking, and if it doesnt break IM sure it would be eating away at you sprockets until they dont have enough teeth to turn the chain any longer.
Well, he ask what the worst thing could happen. Chains do break while riding. You are correct about the sprockets wearing much faster. You can damage engine parts with a broken chain flying back into the counter shaft area causing at least $1,000 worth of damage
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Old 08-09-2009, 10:45 AM   #8
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It's like when this kid down the road from here wondered one day "WHAT IF I was driving 45 MPH and threw my tranny into reverse on my car, what would happen" Of course nothing good at all came of it. Dumbass
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Old 08-09-2009, 11:13 AM   #9
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fuck up your wheel bearings and causes stress on the chain,,
chain should be able to flex 20mm .dude..
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Old 08-09-2009, 11:17 AM   #10
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not mention if ur chain breaks u could send it through the case $$$$$
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Old 08-09-2009, 12:15 PM   #11
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Default Chain

When your chain is to tight your swing arm is not aloud full movement. Second it will cause abnormal wear to the chain and sprockets. It could break also and if it decided to wrapped around your wheel you could experience what a bull rider gets to do every time he crawls on a pissed off bull.

Most riders do not know how to adjust their chain. You want slack in the chain with you sitting on the bike 1/4 to 1/2 inch. Most riders adjust it while it is on the side stand or rear stand never taking the time to sit on the bike to see if there is slack with the rider on the bike. You might think the chain has slack in it but soon as you sit on the bike it now has no play and is tight this is bad.

When you adjust your chain sit on the bike have a friend make sure there is play with your body weight in mind on the bike.

On another note your want to lube your chain after riding you want the chain to be warm.
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Old 08-09-2009, 05:03 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuspensionGooRu View Post
When your chain is to tight your swing arm is not aloud full movement. Second it will cause abnormal wear to the chain and sprockets. It could break also and if it decided to wrapped around your wheel you could experience what a bull rider gets to do every time he crawls on a pissed off bull.

Most riders do not know how to adjust their chain. You want slack in the chain with you sitting on the bike 1/4 to 1/2 inch. Most riders adjust it while it is on the side stand or rear stand never taking the time to sit on the bike to see if there is slack with the rider on the bike. You might think the chain has slack in it but soon as you sit on the bike it now has no play and is tight this is bad.

When you adjust your chain sit on the bike have a friend make sure there is play with your body weight in mind on the bike.

On another note your want to lube your chain after riding you want the chain to be warm.
Exactly. 99.9% of street riders don't know why the slack is needed. Not only will the chain stretch a bit when the rider puts weight on the seat but if you are an aggressive rider in the twisties/canyons and you enter a turn the suspension loads. When the suspension is loaded the wheel base of the bike increases and needs even more slack than just sitting on the bike. I personally like my chain to almost hit my swingarm on the bottom side...so basically about 2" of slack which is more than the recommended amount. However, my sprockets/chains have lasted me forever it seems and I ride alot more aggressive in the twisties than most
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Old 08-09-2009, 09:09 PM   #13
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if you really wanted to be sure you could suspend the back of the bike by the subframe, pull the rear shock and move the swingarm through the full range of motion with the rear wheel in place and note how much slack is needed with the rear unloaded vs when it is bottomed out.

or you could just use the spec supplied by Suzuki!

Running it too slack isn't a great idea either, especially if it starts slapping around and rubbing on things it shouldn't.

like everything there is a happy medium to be had.

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Old 08-10-2009, 10:42 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJW View Post
if you really wanted to be sure you could suspend the back of the bike by the subframe, pull the rear shock and move the swingarm through the full range of motion with the rear wheel in place and note how much slack is needed with the rear unloaded vs when it is bottomed out.

or you could just use the spec supplied by Suzuki!

Running it too slack isn't a great idea either, especially if it starts slapping around and rubbing on things it shouldn't.

like everything there is a happy medium to be had.

Jeff

it seems my chain is too tight. how can I loose it? I believe there is a how to somewhere, but i didnt find it. can anyone give a link?
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Old 08-10-2009, 11:42 AM   #15
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I hope your joking!


loosen axle. back off 12mm jam nut use 10mm wrench to back off the push screwsuntil desired slack which on your stand should be about 1.5" deflection on the chain centered between the front and rear sprocket under the swing arm,watch the adjustor lines on both sides of the swing arm and make sure they are equal, tighten axle and push screws. recheck chain deflection and adjust if necassary. and if you don't understand what i am saying you should probably take it to a dealership or have someone show you how so you don't kill yourself or destroy your bike.
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Old 08-10-2009, 11:55 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bustanut View Post
I hope your joking!


loosen axle. back off 12mm jam nut use 10mm wrench to back off the push screwsuntil desired slack which on your stand should be about 1.5" deflection on the chain centered between the front and rear sprocket under the swing arm,watch the adjustor lines on both sides of the swing arm and make sure they are equal, tighten axle and push screws. recheck chain deflection and adjust if necassary. and if you don't understand what i am saying you should probably take it to a dealership or have someone show you how so you don't kill yourself or destroy your bike.
Bustanut, have you ever used the screwdriver on the chain method to keep proper slack while torqueing the axel nut?
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Old 08-10-2009, 01:47 PM   #17
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i have never used a screwdriver, i have always just used a shop rag and rolled it back in the sprocket. i have heard of the screwdriver technique from Chango I think. but not sure how that works
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Old 08-10-2009, 06:48 PM   #18
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i have never used a screwdriver, i have always just used a shop rag and rolled it back in the sprocket. i have heard of the screwdriver technique from Chango I think. but not sure how that works
Similiar to the rag but more precise.
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Old 09-05-2009, 12:06 AM   #19
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Default Chain adjustment

On the K8 600, how many adjustment lines should be showing using the stock chain to insure proper slack? Anyone know? I forgot to take note prior to removing the wheel to have my tire changed... now, my chain feels entirely too tight!!!
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Old 09-05-2009, 04:27 AM   #20
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On the K8 600, how many adjustment lines should be showing using the stock chain to insure proper slack? Anyone know? I forgot to take note prior to removing the wheel to have my tire changed... now, my chain feels entirely too tight!!!
You don't have to loosen the adjuster bolts to remove/install the wheel. If you do, then you just added twice the amount of time to change a tire, sprocket, or whatever you needed to do for the wheel to come off. Don't know what side your axel nut is on from the factory but it's easier to have it on the right side (exhaust side). If it's on the left side, just flip the axel around. As far as adjusting the chain, everyone has their preference and some chains are stretched more than others so another rider's measurements probably won't help you anywyays. Just get the chain on and get it in the ballpark as far as proper slack (about an inch up and down but I like 1.5" for me) with you sitting on the bike.
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Old 09-05-2009, 07:15 AM   #21
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+1 with you da man. I tend to rum mine on the lose side also. But for a different reason, if you ride with passengers that will change your ride height also! Rather have the chain alittle lose rather than eat up the bearings in the trans.
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Old 09-05-2009, 08:18 AM   #22
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+1 with runnin loser (around 1.25"-1.50") then most as I ride with a passenger a lot and I get pretty aggressive in the twisties.

JPG I use the screwdriver trick as well. As YDM said its a more precise method. (and its jst the way I was taught)
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Old 09-05-2009, 11:23 AM   #23
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On my k8 600 the book says .75"-1.25" slack in the chain. I used to run exactly 1" of slack, but lately ive been running 1.25". Ive always thought at 1" the chain was a lil tight but i figured this is what suz suggested so it must be alright.

A couple of people mentioned setting their slack at 1.50". Isnt that kinda loose? If i set my 08 that loose, the chain will hit the bottom of the rubber guide on the swingarm. Is there different chain slack specs for different years?
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Old 09-05-2009, 05:06 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Dmcblaster View Post
On my k8 600 the book says .75"-1.25" slack in the chain. I used to run exactly 1" of slack, but lately ive been running 1.25". Ive always thought at 1" the chain was a lil tight but i figured this is what suz suggested so it must be alright.

A couple of people mentioned setting their slack at 1.50". Isnt that kinda loose? If i set my 08 that loose, the chain will hit the bottom of the rubber guide on the swingarm. Is there different chain slack specs for different years?
My chains pretty much hit the chain guide (aka: glide) under the swingarm. I've done that with my GSXR's and R6's
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