Wheelie 101 - GSXR.com
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post #1 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-08-2005, 12:03 PM Thread Starter
 
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Wheelie 101

I got this off another site. I am posting it so look before you ask. It is in two parts.

Two points to keep in mind when learning to Wheelie:

1. Keep things simple. You only have so much attention, and it's best to keep it divided by as few things as possible. Usually, when a beginning student is overwhelmed with trying to perform too many unfamiliar actions all at the same time, he or she tends not to perform any of them properly. The following approach to learning will stress using the fewest number of control inputs necessary to accomplish our goal' putting the front tire in the air.

There are, essentially, three basic factors you need to control when performing a basic wheelie:
1. Acceleration (throttle control)
2. Fore/Aft weight distribution (body control)
3. Side/Side weight distribution (balance / body control)

Any late model 600+ cc sportbike that I can think of, in stock form, will easily pull the front wheel up to 12-o-clock & beyond in 1st gear if you do nothing else than keep your body motionless and slam the throttle open once in the powerband. No shit. You may think this not to be the case, but trust me, unless your bike is malfunctioning, it's just that easy. The reason most people fail is due to the fact that they unwittingly shift their weight forward. We'll get to that later. The point being, there's no need to bounce it up, there's no need to clutch it up, and there's no need to roll off & on the throttle in 1st. Most of these techniques essentially fool the rider into committing him or herself to leaning their weight back - the rebound from the fork springs is, in my opinion, negligible. And the control that some people tout the clutch as offering you can easily be had with a well-practiced throttle hand. That means there's a lot less to do and think about when you're starting out, and that means you'll be a lot more likely to succeed, and a lot less likely to get hurt. Even using these 'other' techniques, you'll still need to control your throttle, your weight distribution, & your balance. There's just no sense in adding in more complication.

2. Keep things safe. That means finding a desolate stretch of straight road with good pavement(an old airstrip or race track would be best), wearing ALL your gear (gloves, leathers, boots, HELMET, HELMET, HELMET), having friends with cages present, and pre-ride checking your bike (tire condition & pressure, chain condition & slack, brakes, shift lever & position, etc.). It also includes using your head, thinking things through, and above all, not trying to rush your progress. There's no reason why you can't learn to roll nice wheelies without looping it. Remember, just because you know of or have watched people walk away from similar wrecks doesn't mean everyone does. The consequences of looping a hi-power sportbike are a serious matter.

Now, since I'm going to recommend starting out rolling first gear wheelies, let's address a few concerns.

Gearing and Gear Selection:

To begin with, you won't need to gear your bike down. Like mentioned above, in stock form, most any modern 600+ sportbike needs nothing more, in first gear, than for you to not use your body-weight to screw things up. So do not throw a bigger sprocket in the back or a smaller one up front if you can't get it up in first. It's your fault, not the bike. You're only making things more dangerous for yourself once you finally do stifle your survival instincts long enough to let the wheel come up. Next, there's the issue of 1st gear being too twitchy. Well, for the experienced wheelie expert, 1st gear can be rather dangerous, since the balance point (the vertical point where you have to hang the front wheel to keep the bike from accelerating), is so high, and 1st gear does offer up alot of torque. But for the beginner, who will inevitably slam the throttle shut the minute the front tire comes off the tarmac, it's not really an issue. And trust me, even as quickly as the front wheel can come off the ground in 1st, it's no match for your reflexes, unless you've just chased a few percosets down with a pint of Jack Daniels. The fact is, once you get 2nd gear & higher wheelies up past midway point (and past the point where you need a lot of torque), they want to come up and over a lot faster than 1st gear wheelies do, since the gearing is higher. Also, 1st gear offers up tons of immediate engine braking. That means that as soon as you let off of the throttle, the engine braking effect literally sucks the front wheel back down to earth. This will work for you even if you are unfortunate enough to end up going past 12-o-clock. While this effect is apparent in all gears, it is much more so in 1st, and seems to take effect 'right away' in 2nd, particularly, there seems to be a sort of 'time lag' before it kicks in. The main reason I like first gear is that it offers the power necessary to bring the bike up while doing nothing more than maintaining a static body positioning and controlling the throttle. It allows you to free your mind and allow you to concentrate on throttle control, height control, and balance. It doesn't force you to make extreme body motions (throwing your weight back) which, when coupled with everything else, could definitely loop you quickly. In other words, I feel 1st gear to absolutely be the safest gear to learn in.

Use of the rear brake:

This is a controversial issue. Many advocate it's use as another tool that one can use to avoid a loop (which, if used properly, it is); others doubt it's ever going to get used by beginners until it's too late. My feelings on the subject are mixed. Personally, I don't use my rear brake very much at all during normal, everyday riding. Because of this, the use of the rear brake would, for me, definitely not be instinctive when trying to save a wheelie gone bad. I have, unfortunately, learned this fact the hard way when trying to save a 12-o-clock. I believe I thought of hitting the rear brake as my ass hit the pavement. On the flip side, if you do regularly use both the front & rear brakes, you might want to keep that thought in the back of your mind as a last-ditch save attempt. The thing that worries me most about the rear brake, however, is that even if it is used in time, it is very likely going to be used in panic, which could easily lead to a wreck just as bad as if the bike had simply looped over backwards. Personally, I feel that the use of engine braking (a passive safety feature) to pull down 1st gear wheelies is safer, and of course, much easier, since all you have to do is let off on the throttle. Finally, especially if you don't use the rear brake consistently, but even if you do, keeping it 'in mind' does use up some concentration that could be spent elsewhere. So, think about the issue, and make your own decisions on this one.

Use of the Clutch

This has already been covered, but I want to say it again. For first gear wheelies, do not use the clutch, you don't have to. Sure, you can use the clutch to feather the power in and control your height, but this is also something you can do equally as well with the throttle, with less wear & tear on your bike, and most importantly, while spending A LOT less concentration. The only reason I would change my opinion on this point is if you're coming from a dirtbiking background where you're already WAY familiar with the use of the clutch, where it's become instinctive. Otherwise, I say don,t use it.

OK, Time to Pull Your First Wheelies!

So, with all these points in mind, you're ready to start. You have all your gear on, you're on a safe, modern sportbike (it could be any bike, but this tutorial only applies to modern sportbikes), you're on a safe road, and you have buddies standing by to help you if things to awry. Start out on your bike looking down a long stretch of open highway. Sit as you normally would on it' you might want to sit a little further back on the seat if you sit WAY forward during normal riding (like I do), but you don't have to go to any extremes. What you do want to do is to make sure to support your body with your stomach & back, rather than with your hands resting heavy on the bars. This is the way you should ride anyway, but is especially important for wheelying. You want to lock your legs down on the bike so that, as she starts to come up, you don't pull back on the bars to 'hold on', which could possibly cause you to open up the gas more than you want to. Also, you need to be loose on the bars to be able to modulate the throttle (though this will come later). Essentially, you want your hands, your throttle hand especially, free to move without supporting your body weight, and this can only be accomplished, at least starting out, if you're anchored down on your bike using your legs & torso. As you progress and gain more experience, you can always loosen up a bit on the bike later. But for starting out, stay locked down & keep your arms loose.
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post #2 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-08-2005, 12:04 PM Thread Starter
 
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Now, start tooling down the road, in 1st gear, up until you reach the powerband, which will be anywhere from 4-8K, depending on your bike. I don't look at the tach when pulling up, and you shouldn't either. It's just one more thing to detract your attention that could better be spent elsewhere. You'll be able to feel the power coming in. Anyway, once you do feel yourself getting into the powerband, do only one thing, and this is important, ONLY ONE THING. Open up the throttle quickly to full blast. Do not move your upper body forward, do not move it back. Do not shift your hips. Be a robot ? just move your wrist! If you?re in the meat of the powerband, and you didn't subconciously shift your weight forward, the front wheel just came up! I guarantee it! And if it didn't, read back through this paragraph, think about not moving your body, and try again, possibly at a slightly higher RPM. Rinse & repeat.

OK, Time to evaluate your first wheelie:

If you got the wheel up, contratulations!!!! But - you probably set it right back down. Don't worry about it - this is natural. You probably either cut the throttle, shifted your weight forward as you felt the front end come up, or, most likely, a combination of both. But, you learned something for yourself. You learned that the bike WILL come up on it's own. You learned that, at this point, you don't have to do anything other than open the throttle at the right time to make it happen. Now it?s time to start thinking about how to keep the wheel up a little longer, and get it a little higher. Let's first think about what would happen if you just kept things the way they were, you didn't move your body, and you kept the throttle pinned. What do you think would happen? That's right, you'd loop it! But what would it feel like? Well, It would 'feel' like an exponential curve. The first 3rd or so of wheel lift would proceed relatively slowly (though it won?t feel that way to you!) The second third would go quite a bit faster, and the top third will be, well, you wouldn't know what hit you! Now, what if you kept everything else the same? kept your body stationary, but just started to roll the throttle off a bit once you got past the 1st third of travel? One of three things would happen here, you'd either roll off too much & drop back down, roll on not enough and keep ascending, or roll off just the right amount and, for a very brief time, stay put at that height. Because the bike is still accelerating (& therefore making more power), you can't just hit this magic point at this relatively low height & hold it. But you can stay there momentarily. And you can learn, through practice and experience, to roll on/off the throttle to maintain, increase, and decrease your height. And that's exactly what you need to go out and do now, practice holding your wheelies up a bit.

Practice adding distance

OK, You're back out on your safe road, with your safe bike, your safe gear, & your safety net of friends. Start out first as before, just pulling up little 'popcorn' wheelies to get the feel of things. Once your comfy, it's time to try to add some distance & height. There really isn't very much to explain here, it's mostly a matter of practice and experience. But basically, you want to try to start letting off the gas slowly, rather than slamming it shut, as the wheel comes up. Be prepared to spend a lot of time perfecting things. This is really all a matter of feel. Trust me, if you put some real time into this, you'll learn to roll on and off the throttle in order to keep the front wheel somewhere in the air until your bike runs up against the rev limiter. Of course, how quickly your bike revs out is determined by the height of your front wheel, as you approach the balance point (described above), the engine will accelerate less quickly. If you reach the balance point, it will stop accelerating entirely. Let me state, for the record, that I DO NOT recommend trying to ride 1st gear balance point wheelies, especially just starting out. But, as your height increases, you'll be able to ride out longer & longer wheelies. It's just that simple. And, as you practice, you'll find yourself getting higher and higher. It's just a matter of gaining comfort, which will come in time. Take things very slowly, adding in, through multiple practice sessions, a little more height and a little more distance, but no more than you're comfortable with, each time. If you're interested in how high you're going, it oftentimes helps to have yourself video-taped. It also helps, once you're comfortable managing your height and have some free attention to spare, to glance down at the tach and see how fast you?re still accelerating. Remember, as your height increases, your acceleration will decrease.

I mention running up against the rev limiter a lot, only because, if you do nothing other than maintain a non-balance-point height, and you keep the wheel in the air, you will inevitably run up against it, causing you and your bike to come crashing down to earth in a bone-jarring (& sometimes bike damaging) manner. And, starting out, you're almost guaranteed to hit it at least a few times. But, this is definitely something that you want to avoid. So, at the same time that you're trying to modulate the throttle to bring her up controllably, you want to practice monitoring your speed (via engine noise and/or watching the tach), and attempt to start rolling off the throttle before you hit the rev limiter. You also want to start practicing rolling back into the throttle as the descent occurs in order to soften your landings. All of these things, as mentioned above, will come with time and practice. There's no other substitute.

Advanced (for a beginner) Techniques

So, after a lot of practice and hard work, you're now consistently pulling up first gear wheelies, to a descent height, under power alone, and holding them until just before the bike peaks out. Now where can you go from here? There are a number of things you may want to work on. You may want to work on leaning your body back now, which can help bring up your wheel quicker, at lower RPM, and therefore allow you to ride out your wheelies for longer time & distance. This is good practice for 2nd gear power wheelies, where you'll have to use some body english to pull them up. You can practice using the clutch to pull them up, once again for the same reasons, getting them up quicker, at lower speed, and rolling them longer. Once again, this is also a good intro into 2nd gear clutch wheelies. You can continue to seek higher heights, and reach the illustrious balance point, but once again be warned, the 1st gear balance point wheelie will bite you quickly if you're not careful. You can start trying to pull 2nd gear power and/or clutch wheelies, or try shifting up into 2nd gear from 1st. It's all up to you. But, above all, make sure you lay down a firm, solid foundation of the basics before trying to attempt the more advanced manuevers.

Good Luck!!!!!!!
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post #3 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-08-2005, 07:22 PM
 
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post #4 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-09-2005, 05:52 PM
 
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Up here above 7,000 feet that shit doesn't work. You have to give 'er hell and pop the clutch.
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post #5 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-10-2005, 06:27 PM
 
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post #6 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-11-2005, 12:31 PM
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"the rebound from the fork springs is, in my opinion, negligible. And the control that some people tout the clutch as offering you can easily be had with a well-practiced throttle hand"

All right, so what you're saying is that you have more control by using the clutch, but you can also have that control if you've practiced wheelies a lot and know what you're doing.
That makes absolutely no sense to be telling a begginer who DOESN'T have throttle control yet.
The thing with power wheelies is that first of all, you have to slam the throttle open, and when you do that you're accelerating really hard, and you have to accelerate for quite a while before you hit balance point, meaning that if you start out at 20, you can easily be going 50-60+ before you hit BP, and for a begginer that's really not good.

Another thing is that when you power it up, the wheel slowly rises, slowly rises, and then all of the sudden will shoot up when it's getting close to bp, which for someone not expecting it is wicked scary and often resulsts in looping.

Power wheelies are really unpredictable because of this, it's hard to know exactly how high it's going to come up, and how fast it's going to come up, and if you crash during a power wheelie it's going to cause a lot more damage to the bike because you're going fast. Where if you CLUTCH it up, you can bring it up at almost any speed with much more consistent results.
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post #7 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-11-2005, 12:41 PM
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This is how people should learn to wheelie, the clutch, it's smoother, it's very consistent, you can learn at your own pace and you know exactly what the bike is going to do.

You find an empty parking lot or somewhere that's nice and empty and to get a feel for clutching it, start out by riding around and just popping the clutch. Especially in first, you don't "pop" the clutch so much as "slip" it. You don't need to pull it all the way in and drop it, more like half the way in and bring the revs up and quickly release it, kinda like rock paper scissors and do scissors.

Anyways, you want to get a feel for the bike lunging forward before you try to wheelie it, so slip it like 1,000 rpms at first and as you get more comfortable with it start dropping the clutch 1500 higher, and then 2k, and as you get higher the wheel might start to lift a little and just go with it.
It's all about taking it slow and not rushing into it, once you get comfy start staying on the gas to keep it in the air.
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post #8 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-16-2005, 09:43 AM
 
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wow.. i new to this and i think i'm gonna go josh's route.. it seems easier than the first posting up here and it seems a lil more complicated and unpredictable
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post #9 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-17-2005, 12:22 PM
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actually its not that bad on power wheeelies (especially on a 600)....i've been practicing these for the past 2 weeks and been getting better n better as time goes on.

i take the bike ('04 600) to about 6500-7K..close the throttle and then crack it open...it goes NOWHERE near looping and comes up nice and smooth..havent quite got it up to BP yet but i have been pulling nice, long, smooth wheelies that dont require any MORE throttle than what was necessary to get it up in the 1st place.

once i crack the throttle open and it comes up i just hold the throttle where its at and the front end stays lifted till i let off...BUT i would like to start practicing clutching'em up just because i want to be able to pull it up earlier than 7k so i'll let you guys know how that goes (might go try some this weekend)

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post #10 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-20-2005, 07:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZGixxeR
Now, start tooling down the road, in 1st gear, up until you reach the powerband, which will be anywhere from 4-8K, depending on your bike. I don't look at the tach when pulling up, and you shouldn't either. It's just one more thing to detract your attention that could better be spent elsewhere. You'll be able to feel the power coming in. Anyway, once you do feel yourself getting into the powerband, do only one thing, and this is important, ONLY ONE THING. Open up the throttle quickly to full blast. Do not move your upper body forward, do not move it back. Do not shift your hips. Be a robot ? just move your wrist! If you?re in the meat of the powerband, and you didn't subconciously shift your weight forward, the front wheel just came up! I guarantee it! And if it didn't, read back through this paragraph, think about not moving your body, and try again, possibly at a slightly higher RPM. Rinse & repeat.

OK, Time to evaluate your first wheelie:

If you got the wheel up, contratulations!!!! But - you probably set it right back down. Don't worry about it - this is natural. You probably either cut the throttle, shifted your weight forward as you felt the front end come up, or, most likely, a combination of both. But, you learned something for yourself. You learned that the bike WILL come up on it's own. You learned that, at this point, you don't have to do anything other than open the throttle at the right time to make it happen. Now it?s time to start thinking about how to keep the wheel up a little longer, and get it a little higher. Let's first think about what would happen if you just kept things the way they were, you didn't move your body, and you kept the throttle pinned. What do you think would happen? That's right, you'd loop it! But what would it feel like? Well, It would 'feel' like an exponential curve. The first 3rd or so of wheel lift would proceed relatively slowly (though it won?t feel that way to you!) The second third would go quite a bit faster, and the top third will be, well, you wouldn't know what hit you! Now, what if you kept everything else the same? kept your body stationary, but just started to roll the throttle off a bit once you got past the 1st third of travel? One of three things would happen here, you'd either roll off too much & drop back down, roll on not enough and keep ascending, or roll off just the right amount and, for a very brief time, stay put at that height. Because the bike is still accelerating (& therefore making more power), you can't just hit this magic point at this relatively low height & hold it. But you can stay there momentarily. And you can learn, through practice and experience, to roll on/off the throttle to maintain, increase, and decrease your height. And that's exactly what you need to go out and do now, practice holding your wheelies up a bit.

Practice adding distance

OK, You're back out on your safe road, with your safe bike, your safe gear, & your safety net of friends. Start out first as before, just pulling up little 'popcorn' wheelies to get the feel of things. Once your comfy, it's time to try to add some distance & height. There really isn't very much to explain here, it's mostly a matter of practice and experience. But basically, you want to try to start letting off the gas slowly, rather than slamming it shut, as the wheel comes up. Be prepared to spend a lot of time perfecting things. This is really all a matter of feel. Trust me, if you put some real time into this, you'll learn to roll on and off the throttle in order to keep the front wheel somewhere in the air until your bike runs up against the rev limiter. Of course, how quickly your bike revs out is determined by the height of your front wheel, as you approach the balance point (described above), the engine will accelerate less quickly. If you reach the balance point, it will stop accelerating entirely. Let me state, for the record, that I DO NOT recommend trying to ride 1st gear balance point wheelies, especially just starting out. But, as your height increases, you'll be able to ride out longer & longer wheelies. It's just that simple. And, as you practice, you'll find yourself getting higher and higher. It's just a matter of gaining comfort, which will come in time. Take things very slowly, adding in, through multiple practice sessions, a little more height and a little more distance, but no more than you're comfortable with, each time. If you're interested in how high you're going, it oftentimes helps to have yourself video-taped. It also helps, once you're comfortable managing your height and have some free attention to spare, to glance down at the tach and see how fast you?re still accelerating. Remember, as your height increases, your acceleration will decrease.

I mention running up against the rev limiter a lot, only because, if you do nothing other than maintain a non-balance-point height, and you keep the wheel in the air, you will inevitably run up against it, causing you and your bike to come crashing down to earth in a bone-jarring (& sometimes bike damaging) manner. And, starting out, you're almost guaranteed to hit it at least a few times. But, this is definitely something that you want to avoid. So, at the same time that you're trying to modulate the throttle to bring her up controllably, you want to practice monitoring your speed (via engine noise and/or watching the tach), and attempt to start rolling off the throttle before you hit the rev limiter. You also want to start practicing rolling back into the throttle as the descent occurs in order to soften your landings. All of these things, as mentioned above, will come with time and practice. There's no other substitute.

Advanced (for a beginner) Techniques

So, after a lot of practice and hard work, you're now consistently pulling up first gear wheelies, to a descent height, under power alone, and holding them until just before the bike peaks out. Now where can you go from here? There are a number of things you may want to work on. You may want to work on leaning your body back now, which can help bring up your wheel quicker, at lower RPM, and therefore allow you to ride out your wheelies for longer time & distance. This is good practice for 2nd gear power wheelies, where you'll have to use some body english to pull them up. You can practice using the clutch to pull them up, once again for the same reasons, getting them up quicker, at lower speed, and rolling them longer. Once again, this is also a good intro into 2nd gear clutch wheelies. You can continue to seek higher heights, and reach the illustrious balance point, but once again be warned, the 1st gear balance point wheelie will bite you quickly if you're not careful. You can start trying to pull 2nd gear power and/or clutch wheelies, or try shifting up into 2nd gear from 1st. It's all up to you. But, above all, make sure you lay down a firm, solid foundation of the basics before trying to attempt the more advanced manuevers.

Good Luck!!!!!!!
Great info, for the everyone to know...
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post #11 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-20-2005, 04:19 PM
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can someone post some pointers on "clutching up" wheelies?
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post #12 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-22-2005, 07:59 PM
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check out what I posted earlier, that pretty much covers it. Take it easy, don't start redlining it and dropping the clutch. Start out dropping it at like 1,000 rpm's over road speed and work up from there. Other than that, umm, take it slow, and ALWAYS wear your gear, it's just not worth it
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post #13 of 245 (permalink) Old 02-24-2005, 12:06 PM
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damn near shat my pants today...got'er to what felt like almot 12
oh well...no harm, no foul

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post #14 of 245 (permalink) Old 03-19-2005, 04:30 PM
 
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Clutching up?

I've been riding for 3 years and have never attempt to pop a wheelie... I want to learn how to do it... can anyone explain what clutching up mean?... do you down shift from second gear to first gear?... I know it sound stupid but I just wanted to clearify this
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post #15 of 245 (permalink) Old 03-19-2005, 06:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aznstudd
I've been riding for 3 years and have never attempt to pop a wheelie... I want to learn how to do it... can anyone explain what clutching up mean?... do you down shift from second gear to first gear?... I know it sound stupid but I just wanted to clearify this
clutching it up means that as your going in whatever gear 1 or 2 ususally for wheelies you just rap the engine up to a 3-6 grand then you pull in the clutch, give it more gas and release it kinda fast but just dont drop it. that will pop up the front end. But in my opinion that way is unpredictable especially for newer riders doing wheelies cause you wont know what to expect, your front end could just shoot up alot faster thn what your ready for and you loop it. IMHO power wheelies are alot easier and more predictable, you just have to have smooth throttle control.
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post #16 of 245 (permalink) Old 03-20-2005, 12:53 AM
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^^^^word, from a beginner himself (me)....i totally agree
after a few weeks of practicing i now got to the point where it feels almost natural and i'm getting more and more consistant with the height thanks to throttle control


you'll get to the point where your hand knows exactly how much gas to give when you bring her up

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post #17 of 245 (permalink) Old 03-20-2005, 10:57 AM
 
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Thanks guys!...
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post #18 of 245 (permalink) Old 04-02-2005, 05:48 PM
 
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both posts(gixxer @ josh) are correct and accurate. im no wheelie guru by any means but enjoy it as much as the other. popping or slipping the clutch *especially* on any cc lower than 750 would be the easier way to bring it up while sacrficing the higher speeds required of a roll on. i use both accordingly although the pop isnt needed on the 750 but does allow me to bring it up quickly at much lower speeds. great posts! wear ur brain bucket!!!!
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post #19 of 245 (permalink) Old 04-16-2005, 05:47 PM
 
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Talking just puttin in my two sence

i do em both ways and they are both eqauly effective but i feel that rollons are real good for the begginers just cause it gives them a feel for what it feels like to have the wheel off the ground "for those of you that dont remember the first time you did a wheelie" it is a odd feeling but clutchin it up is very predictable and you can do the same thing everytime.thats all have to say and im stickin to it!!!
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post #20 of 245 (permalink) Old 04-16-2005, 07:46 PM
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well, lil' update here. I've been on the 750 for a few weeks now and pretty much have 1st and 2nd gear whoolies down.
The bike is so much twitchier than I thought it would be, it was nuts the first couple times clutching up 1st, came up wicked fast.
I would say that if if it's your first time and you have no idea what it's going to feel like, at least on the 750, start out in 2nd.
Sitting down, get to like 4-5k and pop the clutch at like 2k above road speed, it'll come up a little bit but not much, really controllable. but doing little sit-downs like this gives you a little feel for the bike coming up.

Now first gear, once you get comfy (somewhat) with the feeling of clutchin 2nd a little, get it high once in a while, I'd move down to first gear.
It's all a feel thing with the clutch, you have to just find it by trial and error, but I've found that the easiest way is to be going at around 25-30 or so, standing staggered, and slowly start accelerating, then, keeping the throttle steady, pull the clutch in just a little bit so that the revs climb a little let the clutch out quickly. You only pull it in just enough so it slips a little, no need to disengage it all the way. Now as you let go of the clutch the bike is going to jump up hella quick, the first time scared the crap out of me. So it popped up but instict makes you just chop the throttle and down you go.

So basically once you start doing that in first, try to get familiar with what the bike is going to do when you drop the clutch, and then start working on holding the throttle steady and feeling the bike rise up under you.
Eventually you'll learn where to drop the clutch so it comes right up to balance point, but until then clutch it just a foot or so and work the throttle to bring it higher.

First gear has a ton of engine braking, so if things get hairy at all you can chop the throttle it's gonna come right down.
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post #21 of 245 (permalink) Old 04-16-2005, 08:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Got2josh
well, lil' update here. I've been on the 750 for a few weeks now and pretty much have 1st and 2nd gear whoolies down.
The bike is so much twitchier than I thought it would be, it was nuts the first couple times clutching up 1st, came up wicked fast.
I would say that if if it's your first time and you have no idea what it's going to feel like, at least on the 750, start out in 2nd.
Sitting down, get to like 4-5k and pop the clutch at like 2k above road speed, it'll come up a little bit but not much, really controllable. but doing little sit-downs like this gives you a little feel for the bike coming up.

Now first gear, once you get comfy (somewhat) with the feeling of clutchin 2nd a little, get it high once in a while, I'd move down to first gear.
It's all a feel thing with the clutch, you have to just find it by trial and error, but I've found that the easiest way is to be going at around 25-30 or so, standing staggered, and slowly start accelerating, then, keeping the throttle steady, pull the clutch in just a little bit so that the revs climb a little let the clutch out quickly. You only pull it in just enough so it slips a little, no need to disengage it all the way. Now as you let go of the clutch the bike is going to jump up hella quick, the first time scared the crap out of me. So it popped up but instict makes you just chop the throttle and down you go.

So basically once you start doing that in first, try to get familiar with what the bike is going to do when you drop the clutch, and then start working on holding the throttle steady and feeling the bike rise up under you.
Eventually you'll learn where to drop the clutch so it comes right up to balance point, but until then clutch it just a foot or so and work the throttle to bring it higher.

First gear has a ton of engine braking, so if things get hairy at all you can chop the throttle it's gonna come right down.

good info.

EX - proud owner of '04 gixx 600 *SOLD*

If your shit ain't from Japan, its NOT JDM bitch
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post #22 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-16-2005, 04:43 AM
 
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Anyone ever done wheelies on old heavy bikes?

Sorta like my 92 750...which is almost 500lbs dry!!!

The front end has come up on me a few times when I'm hard on the throttle coming out of corners...so it will def. do power wheelies (usually 2nd gear).

Any times for the old heavy?
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post #23 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-16-2005, 09:43 AM
 
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best description ive ever heard!!!!
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post #24 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-20-2005, 03:59 AM
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i have been searching and searching for this info all friggen day! i tried a clutch dropper from dead stop in first, popped up the wheel about 6 inches and let go of the throttle to bring it back down only to smack my nuts on the tank =) this was before i read your posts here. now i think i gots the understanding of the wheelie alot better! gonna try some without popping tomorrow and see if i can bring it up a bit higher without the nut smash this time. you guys rock, I'm linking this post to another forum i was asking how to do wheelies. thanks! keep up the good work!!!

Last edited by cakemonster; 05-22-2005 at 07:54 PM. Reason: spelling
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post #25 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-20-2005, 11:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cakemonster
i have been searching and searching for this info all friggen day! i tried a clutch dropper from dead stop in first, popped up the wheel about 6 inches and let go of the throttle to bring it back down only to smack my nuts on the tank =) this was before i red your posts here. now i think i gots the understanding of the wheelie alot better! gonna try some without popping tomorrow and see if i can bring it up a bit higher without the nut smash this time. you guys rock, I'm linking this post to another forum i was asking how to do wheelies. thanks! keep up the good work!!!
no problem man, if you have any other questions. dont be afraid to ask.
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post #26 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-20-2005, 07:02 PM
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haha, the old "tank slapper," lol, j/k. Anyways, keep going with the clutch, that stuff happens with or without the clutch when you chop the throttle. Just remember to keep your arms stiff and that won't really happen. also standing helps a lot to, but get comfortable with the feel of popping the clutch first, it's kinda awkward until you get used to it
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post #27 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-22-2005, 03:11 PM
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i know this is a bit off topic, but what boots are you guys usin? i want to protect my hooves in case i loop it. i can probably afford top of the line, so don't hold back on me =)
got my matching lather jacket a few days ago, helps with peace of mind
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post #28 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-22-2005, 03:47 PM
 
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Hey guys i can get the power wheelies up all day now after several weeks of practice...but now i need to get the clutching thing done. I know you've explained this a thousand time but i dont' exactly know how to get it done....say im in 1st or 2nd gear going about 4k so i just bring the clutch in a bit and then let it quickly while i give it more throttle? or should i keep the throttle the same? I've tried to pull it in a bit and of course the rpms go up, and when i let it out nothign really happens other than a quick jerk, am i not going fast enough, or not letting out quick enough... Let me know how dumb im being here.
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post #29 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-22-2005, 07:59 PM
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my clutch droppers are kindof doing the same thing ceeken is talking about. must take some balls to rev it up higher or something. I'm gona try and get a good accel going to about 4k, hold the accel and slip the clutch to about 7k and let the clutch fly... to be continued
seems like i may have to add a bit of throttle ofter the clutch drop initially to pull it up a bit. i can pop the wheel an inch no problem lol hella weak. my guess is i'm needin some more rev and a quicker drop with no lean forward

EDIT
just got back from a quick trip to the straight street down near the industrials

i need a wheelie spotter! (yes my friend knows i'm out riiding and where and to call an ambulence if i'm not back by 9 just in case)

when i do the "just gun it" in first gear wheelie, i can't tell how far up the wheel pops. i don't know if i'm even getting the sucker off the ground! on the other hand, i clutched up once... (unaware of rpm) and popped whaaaaaay up and scared the shit out of me, then let of an landed front tire hard and got a bit wobbly. that is so crazy! thanks for the tips! gotta get it down to a science so i can predict what will happen before it does. just gotta remember to look what rpm i'm at when the clutch pops, unless i can dial in the feeling

Last edited by cakemonster; 05-22-2005 at 10:25 PM.
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post #30 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-24-2005, 07:19 PM
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man, is there something worng with my bike?
power wheelies aren't working for me at all. i started trying them at about 6 r's .. and now I'm waiting untill 8-9 k before i smack the juice open. it's definatley powerband. I stay in one spot, don't try to lean forward (unless i don't realize it) and sit my ass back on the seat... i can't even tell if the wheel is poping up! if it is popping up, it's only raising like 1-2" and then sets back down like it's on a cloud of pillows and i can't feel shit. USDM420, i hope were riding this thrusday cause i need somone to tell me if my wheel is getting of the ground. I'm freaked out the clutch dropping wheelies after that first one. lmao... i can't seem to get the hang of this, but i'm also trying to keep myself from going to nutty, i havn't ha this sucker for too long. maybe one of the homies could give it a try on my bike an see if it's me or the bike. man, i gun that shit in first gear and i practically try to loop it, but i can't even tell if the wheel is coming up
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post #31 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-24-2005, 10:33 PM
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damn man hahaha
i can give it a shot thursday or at least show you how i do it on my bike....i bet you're not positioniong your body right...you're probably too tense, and you'll think you aren't!!! BUT, wait until you really get comfortable doing them right, and you'll realise what i'm talking about...just the slightest relaxation and lean can make a world of difference...ANY added weight to the front end will bring it down

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post #32 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-25-2005, 07:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cakemonster
man, is there something worng with my bike?
power wheelies aren't working for me at all. i started trying them at about 6 r's .. and now I'm waiting untill 8-9 k before i smack the juice open. it's definatley powerband. I stay in one spot, don't try to lean forward (unless i don't realize it) and sit my ass back on the seat... i can't even tell if the wheel is poping up! if it is popping up, it's only raising like 1-2" and then sets back down like it's on a cloud of pillows and i can't feel shit. USDM420, i hope were riding this thrusday cause i need somone to tell me if my wheel is getting of the ground. I'm freaked out the clutch dropping wheelies after that first one. lmao... i can't seem to get the hang of this, but i'm also trying to keep myself from going to nutty, i havn't ha this sucker for too long. maybe one of the homies could give it a try on my bike an see if it's me or the bike. man, i gun that shit in first gear and i practically try to loop it, but i can't even tell if the wheel is coming up
yea like your buddy said make sure you aren't riding the tank..that was my problem at first. try to sit back as far as you can on your seat. And it doesn't sound like you are getting up at all...you'll know as soon as you get it up. Also when you are taking it to 8-9K are you letting off the throttle before you gun it? you need to do that and feel the front end of the bike drop down right before you open it up. You will know exactly what im talking about when it happens. Im not sure how big your bike is and year...but mine is 01 600 and i take it up to 9-10K let off the throttle till the front drops (takes only a half a sec.) then open. and it'll pop up like nothing. good luck. also have someone video tape you doing it. that is the best way to get a feel for how high you are.
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post #33 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-25-2005, 09:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ceeken2000
Hey guys i can get the power wheelies up all day now after several weeks of practice...but now i need to get the clutching thing done. I know you've explained this a thousand time but i dont' exactly know how to get it done....say im in 1st or 2nd gear going about 4k so i just bring the clutch in a bit and then let it quickly while i give it more throttle? or should i keep the throttle the same? I've tried to pull it in a bit and of course the rpms go up, and when i let it out nothign really happens other than a quick jerk, am i not going fast enough, or not letting out quick enough... Let me know how dumb im being here.
i dont think theres any certian rpm to be in what i do is pull the clutch in jus a lil so its disingauged and trottle closed then in one motion i open the throttle and let the clutch out.....im still opening my throttle as im letting out the clutch, its a feel thing kinda like when your in your stick shift car going up a lil hill from a dead stop...also i always give it a lil bounce no matter what speed im at even if its from a dead stop it jus makes it smoother
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post #34 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-25-2005, 10:05 AM
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hmmmm. i tried the clutch several times and its too jerky for me right now...for beginners i totally suggest powering it up to get a feel for the wheel coming up..

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post #35 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-25-2005, 11:48 AM
 
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My feeling is that some of you guys are over thinking this wheelie thing. To say that I mean you should be concentrating more on feel and the sound of your engine, more than looking at the tach for RPM's. Do you look at the tach before every shift or do you go by feel or sound? Loosen up a bit, I don't agree with the above posters "Like A Robot ". One other thing to remember is as wheelie beginers you are never as close to 12o'clock as you think you are. Have a buddy spot for you and perhaps videotape your session. I use both clutch and throttle for wheelies, I find that both are equally useful. Be safe not stupid. Lastly Practice,Practice,Practice.
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post #36 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-25-2005, 01:41 PM
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sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeet, i'm getting the front wheel up a bit now.. and i can feel it! i hit 7k, let off, and then juice the mother and up she goes! thanks for the tips! it's workin i can do it without lookin at the rpms now that i have the "let off the gas then punch it" idea

Last edited by cakemonster; 05-25-2005 at 02:38 PM.
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post #37 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-25-2005, 04:34 PM
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yeah i used to look at the rpms when i first started too...now i can just roll her up, let off, and WHAK! up she comes....the engine lets me know when she's ready to go hahaha

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post #38 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-25-2005, 10:12 PM
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did my first wheelie today, it was totally awesome. didnt get her too high, dont know if it is cause its lowered or cause i sit so far up on the tank. but thanks for the good info.
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post #39 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-30-2005, 10:35 PM
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ok well i was practicing some more wheelies and when i came back down the front end got a little wobbly, i had control and didnt freak out, but i noticed i was in neutral and figured i hit it out of first going up or coming down. well anyways i tried to put it in second, all i heard was like a grinding noise like when you miss a gear in a car, did the same when i tried to put it into first, finally it went into gear. is this a known occurance, or what please ease my mind. its still a brand new bike.
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post #40 of 245 (permalink) Old 05-31-2005, 03:34 AM
 
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I dont know what that noise is but I damn sure like the color of your bike man. Nice.

And let me ask again, does anyone have any advice for the heavy old gixxer ?
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