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Discussion Starter #1
While I'm not done going through the whole overheating diagnosis process- winter intervenes and some of the bikes get kicked into storage- I'm having to consider the possibility of having to replace our "shed find" '06 600's head gasket.
The manual says the engine has to come out to remove the head. That's a bunch of work. Is there a workaround? I admit the clearances look just about impossible for removal while still in the frame, but a guy can hope.
Bill
 

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I have not needed to remove the engine or do major engine work on my K6 750 but the other bikes I have, not pulling the engine really did not save any time and was a higher frustration factor.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, the weather broke enough (40 degrees and some sun) for me to get in some miles after installing the second water pump. I managed to get quite a ways without any real trouble, although it still appears to me to run pretty hot: 190-205deg on a 40-degree day in light traffic and moderate speeds, 45-65mph.
Then after about 40 miles I did two hard accelerations, winding out in first gear and a good part of second before backing off in consideration of any possible legal issues, and sure enough, there went the temp numbers. Even after easing off to 55mph in fourth, I watched the gauge go way up. The warning light blinked and I saw 251deg before I could even get off the (shoulder-less) road.
Once it went down a bit I eased home but it stayed in the 230-235deg range that last half-mile or so.
Having changed the radiator, thermostat, temp sensor, and water pump, having checked the oil cooler and other pipes and passages for clear flow, all that's left is a head gasket leak.
That's pretty bad news.
I can probably get the engine out and change the gasket, but it would be at the limits of what I'm able to do solo.
This was a derelict, and now I realize the seller was saying the engine was trashed (blown freeze plugs and goo in the oil and coolant after he parked it with water in the system. For two years in a shed.)
Counting the purchase, we're about $2200 deep in the thing including the many parts, the new Pirelli Corsos and the DID VX chain. It's not all crashed up but it has some dings and worn spots.
It runs pretty nice now, given the new plugs, cam position sensor, and who knows what else I replaced, right up until you give it the gun and get the throttle open and tach needle up there.
It's a hard choice which way to go now. I imagine a shop needing at least $600 to do the head gasket. And I just don't know if I'm up to do it myself.
 

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If you know how to use a torque wrench and follow directions, it's not that hard. Honestly, the hardest part is getting the engine to a stable position once it's out.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
#1 and #2, I'm okay. #3, that's my concern. I may not have one of those "assistants" the manuals always talk about at the crucial moments.
 

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A couple 2x6 come in handy. I've seen just a square on the floor with an engine set down in. I'm not sure if you can get to all the bolts, but you might have to re-install and do your final torque on the bike so you have something pushing back. And honestly that might be solved pretty easy with a 6-pack and a neighbor.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I start with thinking about doing the removal with the bike on lift, because crawling around on the floor to undo stuff is unappealing these days. Maybe I need to think about doing the unhooking on the lift and then putting the bike on the floor for the final removal.
I haven't pulled a bike engine since the days of steel double-downtube-loop frames. This might be easier, dropping straight down, as long as I can keep it under control.
Then, I have to admit that it could be worse than just the gasket- the head could be cracked. That would be a mess, having the thing apart and learning the bad news. Our garage really isn't large enough for a stalled project.
Also, I see a special tool is needed for the rear mounts, for the thrust adjusters. I have to look into that, too, I think.
My poor FJR is stuck on the back burner, waiting for the coolant replacement, new steel brake lines, and other projects it is due for. Then there's the ZRX's tires. And the SV's drive chain. And...
 

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Dropping it with a rolling jack on a solid floor is what I would recommend.

For my 05, I bought the tools from Amazon. Both are the Motion Pro. They're double ended sockets for lack of a better term. Essentially, you end up with 4 tools in 2 pieces if that makes sense. I think it was $90 for both, but having the right tool was worth every penny.
 

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I supported my engine on an engine jack then once it was free from all the nounts laid it on it's side on some heavy (dense) 2" thick foam. Did my crap on one side then flipped it over for the other stuff. Others have been able to sit an engine upright in a used tire. A little crafty hillbilly engineering and you will be fine.
 

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Your rear mounts may use the 09940-14990 tool. If you don't need a double ended socket this may be enough. Many people have made their own from deep sockets with varying degrees of success. Mine cost around $10 for the socket and $200 for the time that went into it.
 
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