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So just FYI and something that no one seemed to mention on this post is the cable itself. A old clutch cable will become insanely hard to pull in. Other than lubing the cable/ making sure the cable is binding anywhere has it ever been replaced? 2002 was a long time ago now. I have seem this many times and replaced many cables due to hand cramping. The only other problem assuming the adjustments were done correctly can be the clutch basket itself. The clutch plate guides wear grooves in the clutch basket aluminum which makes the clutch plates themselves difficult to move. The only way to check this is to pull the cover off and then take the plates out.
 

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2002 Suzuki Gsxr 750
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
That's all the grime and lube from the chain. Pretty typical.

Now, look at your L shaped mechanism closely. See how the cable and the arm form an angle greater than 90 degrees? That's WRONG. At rest, it should be less than 90. When you pull the lever and the cable pulls that arm, at 90 is where it will be the strongest. So, if you start past 90, you're going to have to pull harder. If you start before 90, as you pull it will approach 90. Turn the cable adjuster in and watch it. It should retract to the point the spring is almost fully collapsed.
This is making sense so I had it way wrong to begin with! It only makes sense after having looked at it twice and listening to you all. Thank you for the assistance.
 

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2002 Suzuki Gsxr 750
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
^What he said.

Which goes back to my speculation that the "L" shaped lever was not returning all the way down when you were initially trying to adjust the clutch.

If you pull up on the cable you will see the lever move out on a ramp behind it. The ramp area is what you want to clean and lubricate till the mechanism moves freely and smoothly.
You're exactly right! There was some sticky gunk binding it. My guess is that I went overboard with the chain wax a few weeks ago.

Since pulling the sprocket cover and clutch off to really clean it I've run into another issue.

I can't pull the clutch cable out of the pull tab.
I hit it with WD-40 during lunch and went at it again after work. It's as if the end of the cable is welded/fused into to the pull tab. I can just barely rotate it within the pull tab but can't pull it out
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There's a bulky flat piece of metal holding it that's curved making it difficult to pull it out
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2002 Suzuki Gsxr 750
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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
So just FYI and something that no one seemed to mention on this post is the cable itself. A old clutch cable will become insanely hard to pull in. Other than lubing the cable/ making sure the cable is binding anywhere has it ever been replaced? 2002 was a long time ago now. I have seem this many times and replaced many cables due to hand cramping. The only other problem assuming the adjustments were done correctly can be the clutch basket itself. The clutch plate guides wear grooves in the clutch basket aluminum which makes the clutch plates themselves difficult to move. The only way to check this is to pull the cover off and then take the plates out.
@EVL 750 thank you for the assistance! I'm in agreement. The cable is old and will be replaced to rule that out. Looking to do that on Sunday when it arrives. As for the clutch basket, I will check when I get the new clutch kit coming in the mail next week. This whole clutch maintenence venture turned into me having some fun with all this. I always hear dudes complaining about clutch issues so it's great to get the experience and have this forum to get assistance for what the manual/youtube doesn't cover. My goal is to do it and do it right so I can ride confident and safe knowing I did a good job... And get some track experience at some point but that's a whole different spot on the forum🤣

Thanks again for the help!
 

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Push the cable up so the end is clear of the notch then slide the narrower cable section out through the slot.
 

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That's a safety tab. The end of the cable has a little shoulder on it. You have to put a screwdriver in there and bend that tab up so you can get that shoulder clear. Just remember to crush it back down when you reassemble.
 

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@Todd_Sails Thank you for the assistance! I'll try using the OEM levers and see if that helps

I've heard about Clutchless upshifting (I think it's called blipping the throttle) from one of my buddies but it didn't really make sense at the time. Will go educate myself on the topic
Slip shifting has been around since the dawn of the sequential shift manual transmission. I always urge people to make an attempt to familiarize urself with the technique as there are always two major benefits from having the skill to do it. Firstly, this causes ZERO malicious wear on any clutch or transmission parts. Secondly, your clutch effectively lasts longer. Thirdly, if you happen to have clutch lever, clutch cable, or clutch hydraulic failure while u’re out on a long ride, and probably in the middle of nowhere with no cellular signal…having this skill set will allow you to either finish ur ride, or ride it to the nearest Bike shop, or ride it back home.
Anyway, I did a write up about clutchless shifting and made a video. I’ll see if I can locate the write up and post it up in here. In the meantime, watch my video, the technique is the same for any motorcycle, or car for that matter. Also, do get out there and try it, practice it every now and again, even if your clutch works just fine, in the event of an clutch failure in the middle of a ride to nowhere, having any level of experience with this will be way better than trying it for the first time when now u don’t have any choice.
Watch the video:
 

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Everyone is so worried about the clutch.... My trackbike has almost 30,000 miles on it. Over 10k of those is track. I slip the clutch on downshifts because I don't have a slipper clutch. Pulled the clutch last winter and it measured more than 50%. If you burn up a clutch in a sportbike, you're really doing something wrong.
 

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Everyone is so worried about the clutch.... My trackbike has almost 30,000 miles on it. Over 10k of those is track. I slip the clutch on downshifts because I don't have a slipper clutch. Pulled the clutch last winter and it measured more than 50%. If you burn up a clutch in a sportbike, you're really doing something wrong.
I burned up a clutch on another bike by not having enough free play in the lever and I don't think I'm the only one.
 

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2002 Suzuki Gsxr 750
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
That's a safety tab. The end of the cable has a little shoulder on it. You have to put a screwdriver in there and bend that tab up so you can get that shoulder clear. Just remember to crush it back down when you reassemble.
Solid advice. Thank you! I figured it was meant to be like that but I was a bit nervous to bend it. When I did get around to bending it the end of the clutch was still stuck to the pull tab so I tapped it out lightly with a flat head and some WD-40.

I'm posting all my work to YouTube so I can refer back to it in the future and for visuals when asking for help. I see alot of back and forth on some threads asking for help that might've gone smoother if there were clear pictures/video of the issue or what seems to be the issue. It's a help you help me kinda thing from my view.
 

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2002 Suzuki Gsxr 750
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Slip shifting has been around since the dawn of the sequential shift manual transmission. I always urge people to make an attempt to familiarize urself with the technique as there are always two major benefits from having the skill to do it. Firstly, this causes ZERO malicious wear on any clutch or transmission parts. Secondly, your clutch effectively lasts longer. Thirdly, if you happen to have clutch lever, clutch cable, or clutch hydraulic failure while u’re out on a long ride, and probably in the middle of nowhere with no cellular signal…having this skill set will allow you to either finish ur ride, or ride it to the nearest Bike shop, or ride it back home.
Anyway, I did a write up about clutchless shifting and made a video. I’ll see if I can locate the write up and post it up in here. In the meantime, watch my video, the technique is the same for any motorcycle, or car for that matter. Also, do get out there and try it, practice it every now and again, even if your clutch works just fine, in the event of an clutch failure in the middle of a ride to nowhere, having any level of experience with this will be way better than trying it for the first time when now u don’t have any choice.
Watch the video:
This explanation helped. I do this sometimes for upshifting but NEVER have I tried it downshifting. Doesn't look too complicated. Just need to learn it with my bike. Once I get my new cable in I'll go to the local community college and test. They've got some nice MSF outlines in the rear parking section that I can take advantage of.
 

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2002 Suzuki Gsxr 750
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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Everyone is so worried about the clutch.... My trackbike has almost 30,000 miles on it. Over 10k of those is track. I slip the clutch on downshifts because I don't have a slipper clutch. Pulled the clutch last winter and it measured more than 50%. If you burn up a clutch in a sportbike, you're really doing something wrong.
@rv6john DAMN! I heard stories of new riders burning up clutches learning how to wheelie. Not my scene. For me I ride about the same degree as the average rider. It's good to know that clutches can last that long.
 

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2002 Suzuki Gsxr 750
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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I burned up a clutch on another bike by not having enough free play in the lever and I don't think I'm the only one.
@Winchester Boy I might've done that here in this thread but the consensus is that it was gunk burned up from the cable lube I had sprayed in the cable an hour or so before firing it back up. I panicked and turned it off and came right back to the forum to report. Hope it's not burned but we'll see once my new cable gets here. I'll throw up another video link.
 

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I started a new thread in the Tech section with a full write up on clutchless shifting:
 

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2002 Suzuki Gsxr 750
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Day 4

Back to the bike

Installed the new clutch cable
It was still tight but much less than the old one
I played with the adjuster screw and realized the turns weren't giving "resistance" like I thought in the beginning. The tip from @rv6john was great with that. I did 3 1/4 turns and found a sorta sweet spot for the time being. It's still tight in my opinion. I'm gonna re-adjust it soon till it's reasonably done

With the bike raised on the rear stand I tested putting the bike in gear and messing with the friction zone and found that in 1st and 2nd gear if I let the clutch out the bike will stay on with the wheel spinning.

Something tells me that's not right

Aren't bikes supposed to die when you let the clutch go (stop squeezing it and let it all the way out) or am I missing something?

I was worried so I haven't actually road tested

Read something about the wheel needing to be on the ground in order to test. Not sure how accurate that is.

Video coming soon. Realized tonight that the uploads over the weekend were paused
 

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I played with the adjuster screw and realized the turns weren't giving "resistance" like I thought in the beginning. The tip from @rv6john was great with that. I did 3 1/4 turns and found a sorta sweet spot for the time being. It's still tight in my opinion. I'm gonna re-adjust it soon till it's reasonably done
NO! The manual said, and I said, screw it in till there is resistance then back it out 1/4 turn.

Not one turn, but a turn divided by 4. Or 90 degrees. Or one fourth turn.

"Then shalt thou count one fourth, no more, no less. One fourth shall be the number thou shalt count, and the number of the counting shall be one fourth. Three and a fourth shalt thou not count, neither count thou one eighth, excepting that thou then proceed to one fourth. Five is right out. Once the number one fourth, being the correct number, be reached, then tighten thou thy Holy lock nut of Antioch clockwise thy foe, the poor clutch adjustment, being naughty in My sight, shall snuff it.' "
 

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Ya know, advice is a dime a dozen around here but that is damn good advice...it is worth at least a quarter.

If I recall that is straight out of the original manuscript for the 1417 GSXR DCCL (750 in Roman numerals back then). Do you actually have a copy of the sacred text or have you committed it to memory? Impressive either way.
 
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Ya know, advice is a dime a dozen around here but that is damn good advice...it is worth at least a quarter.

If I recall that is straight out of the original manuscript for the 1417 GSXR DCCL (750 in Roman numerals back then). Do you actually have a copy of the sacred text or have you committed it to memory? Impressive either way.
Me thinks that for your MCDXVII GSXR, the engine would have been III heminae. Just sayin…
 

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2002 Suzuki Gsxr 750
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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
NO! The manual said, and I said, screw it in till there is resistance then back it out 1/4 turn.

Not one turn, but a turn divided by 4. Or 90 degrees. Or one fourth turn.

"Then shalt thou count one fourth, no more, no less. One fourth shall be the number thou shalt count, and the number of the counting shall be one fourth. Three and a fourth shalt thou not count, neither count thou one eighth, excepting that thou then proceed to one fourth. Five is right out. Once the number one fourth, being the correct number, be reached, then tighten thou thy Holy lock nut of Antioch clockwise thy foe, the poor clutch adjustment, being naughty in My sight, shall snuff it.' "
Thanks @rv6john! I need to pay more attention. I appreciate the wisdom. I'll keep the forum open when I go out there tonight to record again.
 
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