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When the RPMs shoot up, does it come back with a hard jerk, or does the speed climb and RPMs drop with a little bit of a shudder? I've also seen older bikes have stripped out front sprockets. Just something to check and rule out.

Next, let's talk adjustment because it's screwed up more than anything else I've seen. First, you turn the adjuster at the perch in until about 4 threads are showing. Then you turn the adjuster barrel at the front sprocket cover in until your lever moves about half way with slack. Next, adjust the push rod. This last step is what gets people. I've seen them turned in so far, or the sprocket cover installed incorrectly to where it was mechanically pushing the pressure plate out. Once you have the pushrod adjusted, then adjust the barrel so you have very little play at the lever. Then fine tune the free play with the perch adjuster. When you're done, the cable should have a just a little slack.

Also, if you really want to test the clutch get going about 30mph. Shift all the way to 6th gear, clutch it and rev it to about 12000rpm. Then dump the clutch (let it out really fast) and hammer the throttle. Kind of like you're trying to clutch up wheelie. It'll do one of three things. 1) The RPMs will stay high with a little accelleration 2) the RPMs will drop to match gear and speed 3) it'll spin the rear tire. #1 is bad, both #2 and #3 are good.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Took the bike in on a trade in not running condition. Been sitting at least a year. Completed all of the repairs listed in my original post and got it up and running. Bike has 23,000 miles. Judging by the forks leaking, the previous owner probably ran it and launched hard and did wheelies, which would explain the wear in the clutch.
Unsure of the oil, but probably over a year since sitting. Going to change it this weekend with the new OEM clutch kit.
The current plates don’t have any paint on them.

That still sounds like slipping plates, or 1/multiple weak springs.
What oil is in the bike
How old is the oil?
How many miles on the bike?
Was the bike ever launched hard constantly?
Do the plates have any colored paint on them (white or yellow)?
Do you know for sure that those are EBC plates and springs (they don't look like EBC plates with the wider padding)? They look like the stock ones 2005 04 05 Suzuki GSXR 750 GSXR750 Clutch Plates Friction Steel Oem | eBay
 

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Discussion Starter #23
The rpms come back down abruptly and then the speed climbs.

I’ve inspected the front sprocket and it isn’t rounded or missing any teeth.

I could still be messing up the push rod adjustment. Seems like it went almost all the way in before I felt tension and backed it off. I’ll try to take a video of it and show the adjustment and hopefully the issues while riding.

When the RPMs shoot up, does it come back with a hard jerk, or does the speed climb and RPMs drop with a little bit of a shudder? I've also seen older bikes have stripped out front sprockets. Just something to check and rule out.

Next, let's talk adjustment because it's screwed up more than anything else I've seen. First, you turn the adjuster at the perch in until about 4 threads are showing. Then you turn the adjuster barrel at the front sprocket cover in until your lever moves about half way with slack. Next, adjust the push rod. This last step is what gets people. I've seen them turned in so far, or the sprocket cover installed incorrectly to where it was mechanically pushing the pressure plate out. Once you have the pushrod adjusted, then adjust the barrel so you have very little play at the lever. Then fine tune the free play with the perch adjuster. When you're done, the cable should have a just a little slack.

Also, if you really want to test the clutch get going about 30mph. Shift all the way to 6th gear, clutch it and rev it to about 12000rpm. Then dump the clutch (let it out really fast) and hammer the throttle. Kind of like you're trying to clutch up wheelie. It'll do one of three things. 1) The RPMs will stay high with a little accelleration 2) the RPMs will drop to match gear and speed 3) it'll spin the rear tire. #1 is bad, both #2 and #3 are good.
293228
293229
 

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So here is your adjustment steps... (bike cold, never adjust the clutch when warm)
1 - undo the cable from the clutch lever
2 - screw the adjuster pictured above at the top of the sprocket cover all the way into the cover.
3 - redo your push rod adjustment (lock nut loose, turn in until resistance is felt then back off)
4 - install cover and begin adjusting the screw out a little bit less than what is pictured. That looks like too much gap between the adjuster and lock nut
5 - screw the clutch lever adjuster in all the way toward the lever
6 - install your cable and begin winding the cable adjuster toward the speedo until there is about 20mm (barely apply pressure to the end of the lever to see your gap) of gap between the lever and the bracket (this will release the clutch sooner)
7 - see how it does on the stand, and if the wheel is spinning too much (clutch sees to be engaged) go out 1 click toward the speedo (keeping track of how many clicks out)
8 - go ride it keeping in mind your clicks out and try different adjustment points if necessary but again remember where you started when the engine was cold.
 

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If fork seals are blown then that's from wheelies not being set down slowly. Some oils have too much Teflon in them to prevent surfaces from sticking together and sometimes this can embed itself in fiber material and cause glazing. Hard to say without knowing the oil manufacturer. Sometimes factory paint will be left on the paints which is why I was asking but to me they look like the stock plates, If you take the cover back off (clutch lever pulled in)you might be able to mic the gap near each spring and see if it measures the same all the way around as an indication of a weak spring or springs (may not be accurate once the springs get hot). I have also seen clutch baskets twisted from drag racing and hard launches and the only way to find this out is by installing perfectly new plates into it or attempting to. If the basket is tweaked then the new plates will not go in and will drag.
 

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So here is your adjustment steps... (bike cold, never adjust the clutch when warm)
1 - undo the cable from the clutch lever
2 - screw the adjuster pictured above at the top of the sprocket cover all the way into the cover.
3 - redo your push rod adjustment (lock nut loose, turn in until resistance is felt then back off)
4 - install cover and begin adjusting the screw out a little bit less than what is pictured. That looks like too much gap between the adjuster and lock nut
5 - screw the clutch lever adjuster in all the way toward the lever
6 - install your cable and begin winding the cable adjuster toward the speedo until there is about 20mm (barely apply pressure to the end of the lever to see your gap) of gap between the lever and the bracket (this will release the clutch sooner)
7 - see how it does on the stand, and if the wheel is spinning too much (clutch sees to be engaged) go out 1 click toward the speedo (keeping track of how many clicks out)
8 - go ride it keeping in mind your clicks out and try different adjustment points if necessary but again remember where you started when the engine was cold.
1) You don't need to remove the cable from the lever. Completely useless.
2) Doesn't need to be all the way in, just until there's slack in the cable.
3) Correct.
4) #3 can't be correct unless the cover is already installed. This should be done before starting adjustment. Too much gap? This is completely arbitrary based on the individual cable. For instance, mine is more than twice that.
5) You want a few threads showing in case you end up with just a little less slack from the course adjustment than what you really need.
6) You can't adjust the "course" adjuster at the sprocket cover with the cable not installed to the lever.
7) The wheel spinning with the clutch pulled has nothing to do with the clutch adjustment. It's spinning because of fluid friction with the oil.
8) There is no ride test required for a clutch cable adjustment. It's either right, or it's not.
 

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If fork seals are blown then that's from wheelies not being set down slowly. Some oils have too much Teflon in them to prevent surfaces from sticking together and sometimes this can embed itself in fiber material and cause glazing. Hard to say without knowing the oil manufacturer. Sometimes factory paint will be left on the paints which is why I was asking but to me they look like the stock plates, If you take the cover back off (clutch lever pulled in)you might be able to mic the gap near each spring and see if it measures the same all the way around as an indication of a weak spring or springs (may not be accurate once the springs get hot). I have also seen clutch baskets twisted from drag racing and hard launches and the only way to find this out is by installing perfectly new plates into it or attempting to. If the basket is tweaked then the new plates will not go in and will drag.
Fork seals fail due to age too....

Motor oils don't have teflon. They have molybdenum, lithium, and other friction modifiers. Measuring springs? They don't change size... If plates are warped, just lay them on a flat surface to check. I've never heard of a twisted basket, so I can't comment.

Dude, stop giving bad advise. Just because things make sense in your head doesn't mean they're right.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Thanks for your time and help. I’ll update once I complete those steps.

So here is your adjustment steps... (bike cold, never adjust the clutch when warm)
1 - undo the cable from the clutch lever
2 - screw the adjuster pictured above at the top of the sprocket cover all the way into the cover.
3 - redo your push rod adjustment (lock nut loose, turn in until resistance is felt then back off)
4 - install cover and begin adjusting the screw out a little bit less than what is pictured. That looks like too much gap between the adjuster and lock nut
5 - screw the clutch lever adjuster in all the way toward the lever
6 - install your cable and begin winding the cable adjuster toward the speedo until there is about 20mm (barely apply pressure to the end of the lever to see your gap) of gap between the lever and the bracket (this will release the clutch sooner)
7 - see how it does on the stand, and if the wheel is spinning too much (clutch sees to be engaged) go out 1 click toward the speedo (keeping track of how many clicks out)
8 - go ride it keeping in mind your clicks out and try different adjustment points if necessary but again remember where you started when the engine was cold.
 

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Fork seals fail due to age too....

Motor oils don't have teflon. They have molybdenum, lithium, and other friction modifiers. Measuring springs? They don't change size... If plates are warped, just lay them on a flat surface to check. I've never heard of a twisted basket, so I can't comment.

Dude, stop giving bad advise. Just because things make sense in your head doesn't mean they're right.
Fork seals more regularly go bad from wheelies than age and a sport bike of this age will most likely not have bad ones.

Clearly you have never had a bike come in where someone used a Teflon additive, which I’m surprised about because you seem to know it all.

I never said measure the spring, I said measure the gap between the outer hub and plates to see if there was spring fatigue (was just an idea because you never know what might show up).

Number one this is a forum and all advice should be taken with a grain of salt because everyone’s knowledge and experiences are different. I try to go by the service manuals and parts fiche then apply what I have seen in the shop or at the track.
 
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