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Discussion Starter #1
This may have been covered on another thread so I would appreciate it if someone can point me in the right direction.

I have a K6 GSXR 750 and I am thinking about removing the baffle in my Delkevic exhaust. I would like to know if anyone here has done that before and if they needed to remap the bike after?

I have seen conflicting articles on the issue of back pressure and causing the engine to run lean and possibly causing damage due to the increased temps. Does anyone have some first hand info on this?
 

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1st - do you have stock headers and a slip on or one of their full systems?
2nd - If you have stock headers your bike does not need to be remapped for general street or track use. If you plan to compete with this then yes you will want to remap it to get the most out of the bike (assuming you have a aftermarket filter, recent valve adjustment, aftermarket headers/full system).
3rd - back pressure is not correct terminology, the correct term is exhaust scavenging and your bikes ability to remove gases. Your bike becomes leaned out by increasing air flow without adding fuel via aftermarket headers/air filter.
4th - I had the 2007 GSXR 750 (same as your bike) and raced it in WERA with no issues or lack of power (BMC full race filter and Arrow GP slip-on, not remapped).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you, this is very useful. I have stock headers and a slip on. I have a standard air filter but I will be changing that to a race one at the next service.

I don’t race the bike. A spirited ride in the twisties is the most I will do.
 

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+1 No "race" filter. At best, go with a K&N filter. Full race filter, (as stated above) do not filter enough for normal street riding.
 

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Race filters don't filter as well in order to gain a horsepower or two. Per Suzuki:
The life of the engine depends largely on this component.
Do you know of a better filter (for engine life) than OEM? I have only used OEM & replaced the original at 5k miles.
 

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I do not have the stats to prove it but I am pretty sure the OEM filter would be the best for engine life. Engine reliability and longevity would be the main objective for the manufacturer. They would not sacrifice engine life for a few extra hp.
 

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SuperMod of the North
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+1 In most cases the little geeks running around in white lab coats with slide rules know what they are doing and have you covered. My philosophy is that these things are fast enough out of the box that you don't have to spend money on performance upgrades. Spending $200.00 to get an extra 5hp that you will never get to use on the street just doesn't make sense...if you are doing it just for the horsepower...

Disclosure statement #1...I was actually on line right before this looking at a set of K&N pod filters for my '89 1100 build because I decided not to go with the stock air box. I am a hypocrite...I know. Do as I say not as I do...

Disclosure statement #2...Not that I think it will be lacking in horsepower, I just like the look and the stock air box is brutal to work on.
 

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I do not have the stats to prove it but I am pretty sure the OEM filter would be the best for engine life. Engine reliability and longevity would be the main objective for the manufacturer. They would not sacrifice engine life for a few extra hp.
Depends on where you live and the conditions. I have always used the BMC full race in my bikes on the street and track, and as long as you clean the then recharge them (K&N filter cleaner/recharge kit, $14ish) then you are good in most situations. This was at least true in VA, FL, MS etc., but when I lived in NV or a more dusty dirty environment that's not as wet then I stock, K&N, or the lesser BMC street were the best for the life of the engine.

My bikes that used the BMC (Yoshimura) full race:
2002 GSXR 750, 80k miles from 2002-2007, heavy street/track/WERA use and didn't have ring issues until I moved to the desert.
2007 GSXR 750, 16.5k miles from 2007-2012, heavy street/track/WERA use but sold it when I joined the Navy (no issues what so ever and worst decision I ever made with bikes)
2011 GSXR 1000, 16.5k miles from 2014-2018, heavy street use but sold it when I moved from Key West to MS because there is no where to ride.
2017 GSXR 1000, 1600 miles so far in 2019, street only and plan on going with a K&N but will consider another BMC.

So based on my miles and timeline I would absolutely say that if you keep your filter clear and charged you are good, and for you if you are happy with the stock filters then I would go with a K&N street which gives you good protection and performance with the perk of being able to clean it.
 

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Suggest that you stay with the OEM filter unless you're racing. This is one of the very few actual tests of filter efficiency. It indicates that K&N isn't so hot.
 

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K&N filters are fine. We had this very same debate on another forum I belong to. That VERY SAME test paper came out in the discussion. In normal riding conditions, K&N are just fine, with the benefit of being able to clean and re-use them. The stock paper filters are just fine too. The biggest difference between using the 2, is that when a paper filter starts getting dirty, it gets clogged, you loose quite a bit of air flow. The K&N will flow better than paper when it's dirty. Don't let it get too dirty, and you won't have this issue with either of them. Biggest downfall to the paper filters, is that you have to either order then, or go out and buy one when it needs to be replaced. Neither really save you any money over time than the other. It's a preference... Choose what you wish to run with.
 

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I looked at the AC Delco and they are mostly General Motors from what I can see, at least on their website. I know in many cases some alt brands are actually made by the bigger companies. It would be nice to figure out who AC Delco and the other major manufacturers make filters for.
 

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^The going there can be difficult. Champion Labs makes oil filters for AC Delco and Mobil-1 so it wouldn't surprise me if they were also involved in air filtration. My only concern there is that the manufacturers are probably going to Champion with specs that they want their filters to meet and those specs are rarely made public. So another Champion filter might have very different specs. K&N oil filters are made by HiFLoFiltro. The OEM Suzuki filters, I think air and oil, are made by Toyo Roki.

I first became aware of Champion over 20 years ago when Delco mentioned that their PF-35L had a synthetic element, was made by them, and listed its micron rating. Early on the filter was only available by special order from their parts department and you needed to know the GM PN.

I really have no idea but it's possible that those overpriced Mitsubishi fuel filters have elements that are made by Roki.
 
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