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Discussion Starter #1
Hey again all,

figured since you guess we’re so helpful last time I’d come here again for my uncertainty before just taking something else apart on the bike.

So I've researched how to completely take the front tire off the bike but I’m hoping that I don’t need to go that far on this next task.

My alignment is way off (see pic) when the handle bar is parallel with the dash (straight) my front tire is way right. So my question is just how far into disassembly do I need to go in order to be able to adjust it?

Also, what are your thoughts on having one brake caliper? The last owner opted for one, but I’m thinking I should add second while I’m down there.

-Major
03-750
 

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SuperMod of the North
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If the Slide Rule Gods determined you need two then you pretty much need two. You will be loosening everything off to straighten but I would be more concerned about how it got that way. It would most likely be an impact and bent forks and damaged wheels are top of mind. May also be why there is a rotor missing. Does it happen to be the left rotor that is missing?
 
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That is a pretty good twist.

The cause is the bike is dropped on the left side as @Tinsnips posits, the lower triple hits the stop but the bars keep moving twisting the top triple out of alignment with the bottom one.

The fix is to take the weight off the front wheel, loosen the upper and lower triple clamp bolts, straighten the wheel/bars and torque the clamp bolts back.

A single disc is a style thing and obviously does not help braking. It is probably adequate for most street riding I guess.
 

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I have an old yamaha (77) with a single front brake and disc.
It sucks.
Even though I've swapped for modern gen 1 busa forks with a 6 piston nissin caliper, ferodo xrac sintered pads and 320mm disc, it is a little butt puckering when you have to stop really hard. Up to 3/4 effort is fine.
 

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SuperMod of the North
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John has a good point. You could start by measuring how far each of the fork tube protrudes above the top triple. Basically you can't fix it till you find what has moved.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks all, I’m going to review all of these suggestions when I have the bike in front of me tonight. I am concerned with the “take the weight off the front” part, will a standard lift stand take enough weight off? Also at first look over I couldn’t find anything that seemed damaged but I guess the mystery of a project bike lol

-Major
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If the Slide Rule Gods determined you need two then you pretty much need two. You will be loosening everything off to straighten but I would be more concerned about how it got that way. It would most likely be an impact and bent forks and damaged wheels are top of mind. May also be why there is a rotor missing. Does it happen to be the left rotor that is missing?

Its the right side. And the rotor is still in tact. It’s the caliper that was removed. I was given the matching, doesn’t seem to have been damaged.
 

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That's way off. I'd be very concerned about fork clamp damage. I highly recommend you take that to a shop. Based on the questions you've answered, you don't have the skill to really assess the damage here.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That's way off. I'd be very concerned about fork clamp damage. I highly recommend you take that to a shop. Based on the questions you've answered, you don't have the skill to really assess the damage here.
As much as I really wanna self teach myself I have to say I agree with you on this. I’m hoping to find someone that will let me sit in and learn. I’m in know way a mechanic but why not attempt to learn a new skill these days right?
 

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I don't disagree, but there needs to be some limits. I've always said an R-type sportbike (or any motorcycle for that matter) is not the place to learn to be a mechanic. Mistakes on a bike can end up killing you. I hear all the time "I work on cars, but I'm new to bikes". That's the dumbest statement I've ever heard. A machine is a machine. Each has it's own specifications and procedures. The mechanical skills transfer directly. Maybe you need some different tools and a service manual, but the skills are the same.

Off my soap box....... When I see a front wheel slightly tweaked, I have no problem loosening up the system and seeing if it'll go back to true. Doing so, I'll look for stop tabs busted and other points that are commonly damaged. If I see them, I enlist a frame shop who has the tools to really check the frame. When I see one like yours, the frame shop is the first step. That's where the experience working on bikes comes in. The frame guy might let you watch, but are you going to invest in frame measurement tools? I'm sure as hell not going to. So why learn. All you need to know is if it's worth working on further and what parts, if any, need replaced. Then, if you have the tools and skill, get a manual and replace those parts.

I guess all I'm saying here is if you have some solid mechanical skills, all you need is a manual to know how to work on that bike.
 

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"Also, what are your thoughts on having one brake caliper?"
That's really dumb. It's reduced the power of your front brake by 50%. This isn't a drag race only bike. I guess you could balance it out by removing two spark plugs.
 
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