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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a couple quick questions, and one weird one...

1. When measuring a chain's slack, I move it up, then down, and measure the distance in between the two points. Do I measure from the top when it's at the highest point and the bottom when it's at the lowest point, or do I measure center to center?

2. When cleaning the bike (not lubing the chain, but washing the whole bike with soap and water), is it ok to get water on the chain? I assume it has to be; I use Dupont's spray lube and I think it leaves a water-proof seal over the chain. Am I wrong?

3. This is the tough one... How in the hell would my chain tighten itself!? I lubed it the other day, and the slack seemed just about perfect. It rode great for the next week or so. I washed it the other day (after not riding for a week or so), and after that the bike seems like it just has to work a bit harder to go the same speeds. I checked the chain and there's definitely less slack than there was. In fact, after lubing it I was almost going to tighten it, but now I'm thinking about loosening it!

I'm not sure if it was water that caused this, or a change in the temperature (because it has gone from 30's to 70's in a matter of days here), but something definitely not right. Anyone have any ideas?
 

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make sure you tightened up both sides of the wheel when you did it the first time, cuz maybe your wheel is twisting a little bit, itll seem tighter because it is being twisted a way it shouldnt be if thats the case, check the tick marks on the sides and make sure you tightened it up
 

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Measure slack several times as you rotate the wheel...the chain may develop tight spots over time...

When measuring alignment, instead of using the gradations on the swingarm use a mm rule to accurately ensure each side of the axle is adjusted out the same distance.

Use a torque wrench on the axle nut to keep the axle from moving after adjustment.

Too loose is better than too tight...
 

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Measure slack several times as you rotate the wheel...the chain may develop tight spots over time...

When measuring alignment, instead of using the gradations on the swingarm use a mm rule to accurately ensure each side of the axle is adjusted out the same distance.

Use a torque wrench on the axle nut to keep the axle from moving after adjustment.

Too loose is better than too tight...
+1 ^^^^
 

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Measure slack several times as you rotate the wheel...the chain may develop tight spots over time...

When measuring alignment, instead of using the gradations on the swingarm use a mm rule to accurately ensure each side of the axle is adjusted out the same distance.

Use a torque wrench on the axle nut to keep the axle from moving after adjustment.

Too loose is better than too tight...
+1

i use my 2 fingers as a guide to how much slack you should have in your chain....:thumbup:
 

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Measure slack several times as you rotate the wheel...the chain may develop tight spots over time...

When measuring alignment, instead of using the gradations on the swingarm use a mm rule to accurately ensure each side of the axle is adjusted out the same distance.

Use a torque wrench on the axle nut to keep the axle from moving after adjustment.

Too loose is better than too tight...
+1. Def measure the distance and torque to spec. Make sure the adjuster bolt is tight too.
 

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If you see your chain start to tighten, check for siezed links! That could be a sign your chain is about to go. Throw your bike on a stand, and rotate the chain and see if you have any frozen links. They tend to sieze at an angle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
If you see your chain start to tighten, check for siezed links! That could be a sign your chain is about to go. Throw your bike on a stand, and rotate the chain and see if you have any frozen links. They tend to sieze at an angle.
If I don't have a stand can I just have my buddy keep it balanced while he moves it forward? Or does it have to be free of weight?

Also, the chain only has about 5k miles on it. Do they really go that fast?
 

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If I don't have a stand can I just have my buddy keep it balanced while he moves it forward? Or does it have to be free of weight?

Also, the chain only has about 5k miles on it. Do they really go that fast?
It doesn't have to be free of weight, but it helps. But for NORMALLY checking chain tension, someone should be on the bike while you check. If you tighten the chain to spec with nobody on it, it will be too tight with a rider. It's better to run a chain a bit too loose than too tight.
 
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