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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys anyone help me? First Post so sorry for begging for help lol.

Was out a ride today and a few times the full dash unit cut out but bike still ran fine. When it cut out all my lights, indicator, pass light the lot was off... Lasted about 20 secs then came on then off after a bit then back on.. Done this a few times at the start of the ride then seemed to settle.

Pulled up to drop something at a house then when I left nothing at all would come home... Had to ride home 40 min journey with no lights or anything on... Having to give it hand signals the lot and try beat the setting sun haha not fun at all.

I've done a few Google searches etc which brought me to this forum, anything I find doesn't seem to give as final answer and the threads are left unsolved... So I'm hoping it's a common issue with an easy resolution.

Basically looking for any ideas what to check or if anyone knows what it could be.

I have a power commander (prev owner) and since I've owned it Ive changed it to LED audi style indicators... I changed the main relay to slow the pulse rate down, could this be causing an issue?

Honestly guys any help at all would be very much appreciated cause that was not a fun ride home at all lmfao

Lots of love D
 

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"all my lights"
It sounds like that includes the headlights and turn signals in addition to the cluster. That's normally a failed ground lead connection at the connector between the main and forward harness. Suzuki tends to use B/W for that lead. If you separate the connector halves, you're likely to see evidence of overheated/burned contacts on it. You can clean the contacts and it will work again. But not for long. The contacts, both sides, must be replaced.

The root of the problem is that the connector is not a sealed type. About five years later they finally corrected it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
"all my lights"
It sounds like that includes the headlights and turn signals in addition to the cluster. That's normally a failed ground lead connection at the connector between the main and forward harness. Suzuki tends to use B/W for that lead. If you separate the connector halves, you're likely to see evidence of overheated/burned contacts on it. You can clean the contacts and it will work again. But not for long. The contacts, both sides, must be replaced.

The root of the problem is that the connector is not a sealed type. About five years later they finally corrected it.
Okay mate thank you so much! Yeah everything is off was torture

Can I remove the pin from the plug, snip it, then re solder a new pin onto the wire and insert it back into the plug?

Or am I talking mumbo jumbo lol
 

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^ What billy v said. There is only one ground wire for all the electrics in the nose and over time the connector corrodes and fails.

It is the big plug, usually with a white/clear rubber boot over it, with about a dozen wires in it connecting the nose electrics to the main harness. You did not mention the year/model of your bike but but generally the plug is located under the left front side plastics.

Finding the right plug and socket to fix it is not easy and a good fix is to just pull the Black/white striped wire from both sides and install a jumper.
 

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I'm unfamiliar with the details of your K4 600 but my K6 1000 uses Sumitomo 6090-1099 male and 6090-1071 female. You can see it here. Yours ought to be it or something very close. It's part of Sumitomo's HM series, which share the same contacts. Note that the prices are cheap enough that you might consider buying both just to get the contacts. The B/W lead probably uses the 16-20 gauge contact. There are many sellers of these connectors.

In the short term you could remove the bad contacts and solder a jumper wire to them, which would run around the connector body. I caution against cutting the wire as you can then have length issues. Instead very carefully file the contact without damaging the crimped wires until you can pry it off of the wires. Then crimp a new contact in its place.

P.S. Note that Sumitomo treats the HM and HM Sealed connectors separately. Their contacts may not interchange. Here're better pics of the bodies and contacts.
 

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For that bike, on the left side fairing have a large connector that gets corroded. Wiggle it & put some dielectric grease.

A loose battery terminal can also cause problems.
 

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SuperMod of the North
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+1 on the di-electric grease. Yes, the ground is the likely culprit. Failing repair of the OEM plug. a work around may be to remove the wires from both sides of the connector and join them with a connector of their own external to the main plug. Let us know how you make out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks everyone for the comments and advice, haven't managed to get near the bike due to work. Hopefully get it out and look at it on Friday.. Its getting a wash and wax so I'll try get the fairings off and have a look to see what's up.

Thanks again lads really appreciate it!
 

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For me I had to manually take each individual pins out of the socket. There was around 12 pins there. Was a pain in the arse.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Sorry I've no update yet lads, weather has been non stop rain in Glasgow so can't get the bike out to look at it. Still working on getting rid of an old 51 plate TT to get my garage space back. Will keep you's updated on my finds. Gave him a wash in between snow showers and dealt with the chain aswel, still not where id like it to be but it's better that when I started.

Before :

293018


After :

293019



293016
 

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You'll be lucky if it lasts. Generally once a contact has failed, it's done for as the plating is toast. Using dielectric grease on new or functioning contacts is a good idea.

I can't tell from your pics if you replaced the chain or just brushed the rust off it. It wasn't being properly lubed and needs to be replaced IMO. There's a fair chance that the sprockets should be too.
 

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Not worth the consequences to keep that chain. I may be able to get by without changing the sprockets, but you MUST get a new chain.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The chain is totally rust free now and looks brand new, been cleaned and waxed.. The sprockets are fine too.

Why "MUST" I get a new chain? There's no corrosion or cracks or anything anywhere it's spotless now.
 

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I can still see rust spots so "totally rust free" sounds like a overstatement. Riding with it so rusty and under-lubricated is going to result in rust being ground into the sprockets as well as inviting water into the insides of the chain rollers. Have you carefully measured the chain stretch, i.e. several places with a digital caliper? If it fails it could injure/kill you or, worse yet, damage the bike.
 

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SuperMod of the North
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Yeah, as these guys have said, it isn't the outside of the chain you should worry about - it is the inside that is critical. The rollers and pins will have rusted and are pitted and weaker now. The rough surfaces will also accelerate wear regardless of if they are lubricated. A new chain is in order.
 
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