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Nice looking bike! And only 400 miles? Poor bike, nobody rode it LOL

As said- you are likely to open a BIG can of worms with problems with those HID lights.

The stock lights on my 2005 bike are good enough- If and when I ever ride at night! Not all that often. YMMV

NIce to hear on the course and the gear- NIce work!

Have fun, stay safe
 
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Discussion Starter #25
Hello everyone, my name is Dhimani and I am a new motorcyclist. I just bought a 2014 suzuki gsxr 750, it is used but only had 400 miles on it. Just wanted to introduce myself to everyone who is apart of this topic/forum.
Good Afternoon, I was wondering if anyone knows the bolt size or the correct bolts for the exhaust. I would like to get the correct bolts so i'll be able to take off my stock exhaust off. The previous seller do not give me the bolts for the exhaust.
 

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Good Afternoon, I was wondering if anyone knows the bolt size or the correct bolts for the exhaust. I would like to get the correct bolts so i'll be able to take off my stock exhaust off. The previous seller do not give me the bolts for the exhaust.
Suzukipartshouse.com will have all the OEM parts and usually lists the bolt size. You can get what you need here.
 

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My light comes on at 100 every time. Maybe cuz its not broken in quiet yet (1000miles). Any way i am gonna get at least a muffler i'll sell you my stock one?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Hello everyone, my name is Dhimani and I am a new motorcyclist. I just bought a 2014 suzuki gsxr 750, it is used but only had 400 miles on it. Just wanted to introduce myself to everyone who is apart of this topic/forum.
Good Afternoon everyone, I hope all is well. I have not been on here lately due to being back at work officially since this virus has shut down my building. I went on a motorcycle ride today on the highway for the first time and it was fun but also intense. The wind was hitting hard and I went faster than anticipated. It is a huge difference going from 25 mph in a residential area to 65-80 mph on the highway to stay in the flow of traffic. I'm still going to practice as much as I can before I am fully confident and comfortable riding my bike up to work.
 

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Good Afternoon everyone, I hope all is well. I have not been on here lately due to being back at work officially since this virus has shut down my building. I went on a motorcycle ride today on the highway for the first time and it was fun but also intense. The wind was hitting hard and I went faster than anticipated. It is a huge difference going from 25 mph in a residential area to 65-80 mph on the highway to stay in the flow of traffic. I'm still going to practice as much as I can before I am fully confident and comfortable riding my bike up to work.
Dmoney09 dang so you are like just fresh outta the box brand new at this? How really fricken exciting for you! Riding a motor and two wheels is, well there is nothing else like it on earth my friend! I wanna share a couple things that i know of to try and flatten your really sharp curve. I hope other will chime in and share too let us help our new friend become a successful happy rider.

1. No matter what happens choose staying on the bike. I have learned from many years on dirt that even when your feeling like doom like you just did something that is sure to be your demise dont ever let go keep your ass on the seat and hands on the bars and 9.5 times outta ten you will roll right outta it or the bike will soften whatever impact you are about to experience. This is number one for a reason.

2. Always expect the idiots dont see you and rest assured if there is a situation where a car is gonna mess your day up its gonna happen. People pull out from side streets on me daily. On a bike you are a magnet for this shit.

3. When cornering get in the habit of telling yourself out loud even "turn the handlebars use the bars." Sometimes people, I have frozen up and blown a turn. Its a survival reaction but you will minimize it to 0 if you remind yourself turn with the bars.

4. Lastly when you are driving through traffic try to stay moving through it be the aggressive driver it makes you stay focused on your next move and you are dictating what happens not just a victim of circumstance. Look as far ahead as you can and stay moving through.

I hope you take my advice many many mistakes have been made and im probably lucky to be alive to tell you this stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Dmoney09 dang so you are like just fresh outta the box brand new at this? How really fricken exciting for you! Riding a motor and two wheels is, well there is nothing else like it on earth my friend! I wanna share a couple things that i know of to try and flatten your really sharp curve. I hope other will chime in and share too let us help our new friend become a successful happy rider.

1. No matter what happens choose staying on the bike. I have learned from many years on dirt that even when your feeling like doom like you just did something that is sure to be your demise dont ever let go keep your ass on the seat and hands on the bars and 9.5 times outta ten you will roll right outta it or the bike will soften whatever impact you are about to experience. This is number one for a reason.

2. Always expect the idiots dont see you and rest assured if there is a situation where a car is gonna mess your day up its gonna happen. People pull out from side streets on me daily. On a bike you are a magnet for this shit.

3. When cornering get in the habit of telling yourself out loud even "turn the handlebars use the bars." Sometimes people, I have frozen up and blown a turn. Its a survival reaction but you will minimize it to 0 if you remind yourself turn with the bars.

4. Lastly when you are driving through traffic try to stay moving through it be the aggressive driver it makes you stay focused on your next move and you are dictating what happens not just a victim of circumstance. Look as far ahead as you can and stay moving through.

I hope you take my advice many many mistakes have been made and im probably lucky to be alive to tell you this stuff.
wow, that is a lot of information that i definitely needed to hear. I still have a couple things that I need to work on, which is getting out of first gear quickly and making better u-turns. Also, making better right turns. I am a lot more comfortable turning left than I am turning right. Two days ago, I was leaving my neighborhood going on the main road and I was turning right but I went too wide and almost went into the other lane while there was a car coming. During the motorcycle course, on the very first day. I stalled out numerous times, yesterday I rode around the neighborhood for practice and I stalled one time. So I am still learning the friction zone or sweet spot as people call it. What I have been doing is slowly releasing the clutch and not giving any throttle, then when I start moving I start to give a little bit of throttle to get going.
 

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@dmoney09 It will be smoother and easier if you open the throttle just a little as you hit the friction zone.

Parking lot practice is a very good thing for these skills. Especially learning a new bike.

I'm sure WhiteDeath meant it this way, but as they told you in the MSF course, you push the grip on the side you want to go. Push right, go right.

Also, being more comfortable turning in one direction rather than the other is pretty common.
 

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One thing they may have told you in your course bears repeating because it is the most important skill you can have when things go south.

Look where you want to go!

Don't look at the ditch when you go wide...look down the turn you need to make. Your brain will always steer where you are looking inspite of if it wants to go there or not.

Bonus tip:. Always know where your exit is. If that car comes into your lane where will you go?? Keeping an empty spot to go to WILL save your life and it will probably do it this year. I know it saves mine at least once a year.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
@dmoney09 I will be smoother and easier if you open the throttle just a little as you hit the friction zone.

Parking lot practice is a very good thing for these skills. Especially learning a new bike.

I'm sure WhiteDeath meant it this way, but as they told you in the MSF course, you push the grip on the side you want to go. Push right, go right.

Also, being more comfortable turning in one direction rather than the other is pretty common.
Yes, I agree. I just gotta keep riding, more and more repetition. I'll try opening the throttle just a little bit as i'm hitting the friction zone method to see if that works for me better.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
One thing they may have told you in your course bears repeating because it is the most important skill you can have when things go south.

Look where you want to go!

Don't look at the ditch when you go wide...look down the turn you need to make. Your brain will always steer where you are looking inspite of if it wants to go there or not.

Bonus tip:. Always know where your exit is. If that car comes into your lane where will you go?? Keeping an empty spot to go to WILL save your life and it will probably do it this year. I know it saves mine at least once a year.
That is a very true statement, trust the look as my instructor told me. Thank you for telling me this and I will work on it.
 
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