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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folkes, just joining here and thoguht I would say hi from good-ole-UK.

Riding a 1000 L2 and a Tenere 700 these days (well, not now that the weather is crap but you get my drift).
 

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Welcome to the forum. Good bikes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That was a like for the bikes, not for the sorry state of UK atm! ;)

Have you had your L2 for long?
Not had the L2 long at all, I had a ZX6R that I ended up doing a load of track days on and decided I needed something 'gruntier' as I was thrashing the living daylights out of it to stay with the litre bikes.
The T7 is a completely different animal that I got to do some miles on, I love it.
Been riding for 40 years now, never used to be bothered by crap weather but apparently I am getting old and my knees hurt in the cold and wet.
 

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Been riding for 40 years now, never used to be bothered by crap weather but apparently I am getting old and my knees hurt in the cold and wet.
Same. My whole body pretty doesn’t like the cold….but that’s why I’ve lived in California for the last 27 years. It gets cold…but it’s a dry cold that doesn’t cut through your gear.

It’s relative too. What I call cold, New Englanders would positively laugh at. Our winter weather here is roughly similar temp wise to the UK….but the sun almost always comes out. At least in this part of winter.

We’re usually at 17-20C by noon. At least until the rains come in January. After that it’s anywhere from 5-12C until Spring. 2 weeks later and we’re pushing 38-40C!

Basically with the right gear and mindset you can ride all year here save for a day or 2 here and there. When it gets so windy that normally stationary things start flying …..I’m probably not riding.
 

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Same. My whole body pretty doesn’t like the cold….but that’s why I’ve lived in California for the last 27 years. It gets cold…but it’s a dry cold that doesn’t cut through your gear.

It’s relative too. What I call cold, New Englanders would positively laugh at. Our winter weather here is roughly similar temp wise to the UK….but the sun almost always comes out. At least in this part of winter.

We’re usually at 17-20C by noon. At least until the rains come in January. After that it’s anywhere from 5-12C until Spring. 2 weeks later and we’re pushing 38-40C!

Basically with the right gear and mindset you can ride all year here save for a day or 2 here and there. When it gets so windy that normally stationary things start flying …..I’m probably not riding.
I recall being in Los Angeles where the average day time temperature varied between 21C in winter and 23C in summer.

'Varied' being somewhat redundant.

California would have been my go-to place of preference for living in the world, unfortunately never had a chance or reason to be there long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The weather is a bit of national obsession over here, we are on the Atlantic so get the west to east systems that keep up 'entertained'.
Summers can he hot (35C ish in a good year recently depending where you are) but are pretty short. Autumn is always wet and windy, winter is always wet and cold, spring is always wet and not so cold (lots of wet).
I used to ride all year round, including through the snow but its not an option these days.
 

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I think the jet stream is further south in North America right now and getting Arctic weather, and those systems are moving over here now. I think a white Christmas here. I'll be declaring it off road next week, until Feb or March (weather depending) and getting a refund on the road duty. Will go top up with E5 fuel before parking up. I was just waiting for the shoulder to get better before riding it once more before its winter snooze.
 

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I recall being in Los Angeles where the average day time temperature varied between 21C in winter and 23C in summer.

'Varied' being somewhat redundant.

California would have been my go-to place of preference for living in the world, unfortunately never had a chance or reason to be there long.
LA is almost a whole other country! 🤣

It’s a 5+ hour drive from here on Interstate 5. Northern California is a bit different climate wise. At least in winter. We pretty much have 4 seasons here. Hot, wet, cold(ish) and fire. The first and last coexist and last for roughly half the year so really just 3.

I spent 2 years in Blighty back in the early-mid 90s. I lived in the Cherwell Valley not far from Oxford….or Banbury in the opposite direction. Mostly what I remember from my 1st year there was overcast gray skies and a constant mist/drizzle. My 2nd year there though….that was magnificent both weather wise and riding wise. Spring/summer of 1994.

My memories of that time in my life are exceptional. Life altering actually. Motorcycle culture there formed my opinions on almost every aspect of my approach to riding all the way up to this day.
Tire Wheel Sky Cloud Plant


My ZX-7 H1 (ZXR 750 in the UK) and my buddy Bill’s ‘85 slabby outside a little village called Brill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think the jet stream is further south in North America right now and getting Arctic weather, and those systems are moving over here now. I think a white Christmas here. I'll be declaring it off road next week, until Feb or March (weather depending) and getting a refund on the road duty. Will go top up with E5 fuel before parking up. I was just waiting for the shoulder to get better before riding it once more before its winter snooze.
Go for Esso Super+ as it is ethanol free (depending on where you live). If you check their website it tells you the areas where the Super+ has 5% and which are free.
 

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LA is almost a whole other country! 🤣

It’s a 5+ hour drive from here on Interstate 5. Northern California is a bit different climate wise. At least in winter. We pretty much have 4 seasons here. Hot, wet, cold(ish) and fire. The first and last coexist and last for roughly half the year so really just 3.

I spent 2 years in Blighty back in the early-mid 90s. I lived in the Cherwell Valley not far from Oxford….or Banbury in the opposite direction. Mostly what I remember from my 1st year there was overcast gray skies and a constant mist/drizzle. My 2nd year there though….that was magnificent both weather wise and riding wise. Spring/summer of 1994.

My memories of that time in my life are exceptional. Life altering actually. Motorcycle culture there formed my opinions on almost every aspect of my approach to riding all the way up to this day. View attachment 299621

My ZX-7 H1 (ZXR 750 in the UK) and my buddy Bill’s ‘85 slabby outside a little village called Brill.
Yes, I do recall those years, and indeed we had a number of astonishingly good years.

By sheer coincidence to your anecdote, and the reason I recall that particular year, I was undertaking graduate studies at the time and became friends with some Californians studying with me here in UK. Having warned them of an impending grey and miserable winter, I was proved wrong by Nov and Dec of 1994 (as far as my golden but now vague memory goes) of blindingly bright days and blue skies throughout. They didn't know what I was talking about and were delighted with the weather here (as we all were!).

In reciprocation, I went to visit them in January 1995 in California, where it rained for the whole duration of my 2 week visit, a state of emergency was declared (honestly, I didn't do it! ;) ) and everything was green and lush and looked like Yorkshire.

I was in the States again later at the end of 1995 and was there to witness the day that Federal 55mph speed limit was dropped. My hosts all went out for a drive, as the whole of the US population seemed to be doing, just to drive up and down the freeway at ... wow .. 65mph! :p :ROFLMAO: to watch the workmen take down the speed limit signs (AFAIR it was a holiday day off, but they all came out to take the signs down as some sort of act of cultural engagement or something!).

Sigh. To be young again. I recall that sense of .. a future! :sneaky: :D
 

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Go for Esso Super+ as it is ethanol free (depending on where you live). If you check their website it tells you the areas where the Super+ has 5% and which are free.
Thanks, I'll check that out.

I'm aware that quite a few were doing this some time back, but that was in E5 days, now it's E10 for fleet average.
 

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That would have been when I came out to California from Florida. I got here in late 1995. Weather went from gorgeous to gray and raining in a few short weeks.

However, in those short few weeks I found the back roads here in NorCal to be similar to those around Oxfordshire. Between curvy roads less than 15 minutes from my Condo and a whole lot of extended family nearby, I knew pretty quick that I was home.

Don’t get me wrong, I get what I call “Happy Feet”
after a while where I have to travel somewhere else for a bit but it always feels good to get home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes, I do recall those years, and indeed we had a number of astonishingly good years.

By sheer coincidence to your anecdote, and the reason I recall that particular year, I was undertaking graduate studies at the time and became friends with some Californians studying with me here in UK. Having warned them of an impending grey and miserable winter, I was proved wrong by Nov and Dec of 1994 (as far as my golden but now vague memory goes) of blindingly bright days and blue skies throughout. They didn't know what I was talking about and were delighted with the weather here (as we all were!).

In reciprocation, I went to visit them in January 1995 in California, where it rained for the whole duration of my 2 week visit, a state of emergency was declared (honestly, I didn't do it! ;) ) and everything was green and lush and looked like Yorkshire.

I was in the States again later at the end of 1995 and was there to witness the day that Federal 55mph speed limit was dropped. My hosts all went out for a drive, as the whole of the US population seemed to be doing, just to drive up and down the freeway at ... wow .. 65mph! :p :ROFLMAO: to watch the workmen take down the speed limit signs (AFAIR it was a holiday day off, but they all came out to take the signs down as some sort of act of cultural engagement or something!).

Sigh. To be young again. I recall that sense of .. a future! :sneaky: :D
You need the rain over there to put all the fires out ;)
 

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You need the rain over there to put all the fires out ;)
It's actually a difficult balance in dry climates like CA because with a lot of rain you get a lot of growth, so a lot of fire fuel for the hot season. It's arguably better for fire resistance to get dry winters, then there's less fuel that grows, but also the reservoirs are dry. To prove the point, I think there were serious fires in CA that following year. I mean, there are every year but it hit more communities that year.
 

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Fire season here is when we go for several weeks with temps from 38-40C with winds out of the East. Any winds from that direction, or NE/SE are dry. Not only are they dry but they wick any remaining moisture out. I’ve literally walked on grass so dead it turned to dust with each step.

Also, I’ve seen it so dry that the sun shining through a discarded plastic soda bottle was enough to start a fire. Same with a shard of broken glass. These are ones I witnessed as they happened, and was able to put them out with the help of others. Had no one been around, both of those could have become serious enough to destroy structures or worse.

Very true that the wetter our winters are, the more fuel growth we get. In my immediate neighborhood, a great deal of that is wild anise. Makes for wonderful early spring rides…Moto or Bicycle. The air smells of licorice on my local roads which I find quite pleasant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Fire season here is when we go for several weeks with temps from 38-40C with winds out of the East. Any winds from that direction, or NE/SE are dry. Not only are they dry but they wick any remaining moisture out. I’ve literally walked on grass so dead it turned to dust with each step.

Also, I’ve seen it so dry that the sun shining through a discarded plastic soda bottle was enough to start a fire. Same with a shard of broken glass. These are ones I witnessed as they happened, and was able to put them out with the help of others. Had no one been around, both of those could have become serious enough to destroy structures or worse.

Very true that the wetter our winters are, the more fuel growth we get. In my immediate neighborhood, a great deal of that is wild anise. Makes for wonderful early spring rides…Moto or Bicycle. The air smells of licorice on my local roads which I find quite pleasant.
Nothing for it then... agent orange the whole lot and no fuel will grow again. Easy peezy :cool:
 

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LA is almost a whole other country! 🤣

It’s a 5+ hour drive from here on Interstate 5. Northern California is a bit different climate wise. At least in winter. We pretty much have 4 seasons here. Hot, wet, cold(ish) and fire. The first and last coexist and last for roughly half the year so really just 3.

I spent 2 years in Blighty back in the early-mid 90s. I lived in the Cherwell Valley not far from Oxford….or Banbury in the opposite direction. Mostly what I remember from my 1st year there was overcast gray skies and a constant mist/drizzle. My 2nd year there though….that was magnificent both weather wise and riding wise. Spring/summer of 1994.

My memories of that time in my life are exceptional. Life altering actually. Motorcycle culture there formed my opinions on almost every aspect of my approach to riding all the way up to this day. View attachment 299621

My ZX-7 H1 (ZXR 750 in the UK) and my buddy Bill’s ‘85 slabby outside a little village called Brill.
First off, welcome! Great pairing for the bikes.

Second, this site doesn’t allow porn. Send all your slabbie pics directly to me by PM. Now. Do it now.
 
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