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2009 SUZUKI GSXR 750
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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so I'm going to do my plugs tom. And I have a 2009 gsxr 750 now I went a grabbed 4 NGK CR9E k And now my bike recommends a gap of 0.028 n the gap on these ones are 0.031 but yet when I match vehical with plug it says good to hmgi
 

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SuperMod of the North
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26,679 Posts
You usually have to set the gap. A gentle tap on the bench is usually enough to close it up a bit. Check with a spark plug gauge.
 

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Super Moderator
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Ok so I'm going to do my plugs tom. And I have a 2009 gsxr 750 now I went a grabbed 4 NGK CR9E k And now my bike recommends a gap of 0.028 n the gap on these ones are 0.031 but yet when I match vehical with plug it says good to hmgi
^What they said.

A couple of tricks to make the job easier.
1) Be gentle with the wires and coil sticks. Look at the coil stick for arcing burn marks on the outside after you get them out.
2) Blow out the spark plug wells before you loosen the spark plug. Loosen the plug a bit and blow out the well again.
3) Have some universal joints ready for your socket set as the outside plugs can be harder to get to.
4) Find a piece of rubber tubing that just slips over the spark plug insulator and use this to remove and install the spark plug. That way you don't drop it down the well and change the gap and the chances of cross threading are reduced. A dab of Never Seize on the threads is a good idea.
5) If any of the spark plugs show any corrosion on the hex part, it is likely the drain hole is blocked and the well is collecting water. The drain hole goes from the bottom of the well out to the front of the cylinder head. If you find oil, you have a leak from the cam chain cover.
5) You should use a torque wrench on the spark plugs. It is not very much. 8 lb ft / 96 lb in. It is best to have a smaller torque wrench and most of these go to 200 lb in.
 

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2009 SUZUKI GSXR 750
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7 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
^What they said.

A couple of tricks to make the job easier.
1) Be gentle with the wires and coil sticks. Look at the coil stick for arcing burn marks on the outside after you get them out.
2) Blow out the spark plug wells before you loosen the spark plug. Loosen the plug a bit and blow out the well again.
3) Have some universal joints ready for your socket set as the outside plugs can be harder to get to.
4) Find a piece of rubber tubing that just slips over the spark plug insulator and use this to remove and install the spark plug. That way you don't drop it down the well and change the gap and the chances of cross threading are reduced. A dab of Never Seize on the threads is a good idea.
5) If any of the spark plugs show any corrosion on the hex part, it is likely the drain hole is blocked and the well is collecting water. The drain hole goes from the bottom of the well out to the front of the cylinder head. If you find oil, you have a leak from the cam chain cover.
5) You should use a torque wrench on the spark plugs. It is not very much. 8 lb ft / 96 lb in. It is best to have a smaller torque wrench and most of these go to 200 lb in.

Right on thanks for that greatly appreciated this will be a big help also instead of the tubing I went out n bought a rubber coated magnetic spark plug socket so they will not fall that's forsure
 

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Those magnetic sockets work great. You'll have no problems at all. Good on you for learning to do it yourself. (y)
Problem is... my hands don't work as well as they did in years past. Because of a slight numbness in my fingers, I have a tendency to over tighten or force stuff. Using a flexible rubber tubing as an extension allows me to "feel" but not "force" the spark plug. It allows me to properly align and screw in the plug but won't allow me to apply enough pressure to cross-thread the plug and cylinder head.
 

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2009 SUZUKI GSXR 750
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7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Those magnetic sockets work great. You'll have no problems at all. Good on you for learning to do it yourself. (y)
Problem is... my hands don't work as well as they did in years past. Because of a slight numbness in my fingers, I have a tendency to over tighten or force stuff. Using a flexible rubber tubing as an extension allows me to "feel" but not "force" the spark plug. It allows me to properly align and screw in the plug but won't allow me to apply enough pressure to cross-thread the plug and cylinder head.


Nice ya well tom is the day doing plugs brakes pads n fluid n oil n then all cables lined etc
 
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