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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to change the rear tire on my K8 600. I ordered a new rear tire, rim savers, and 2 tire irons.

Ive been watching "how to's" online. I dont think ill have any problems getting the tire off and the new one on.

Heres my questions.
Everyone online suggest that the yellow dot on the new tire be lined up with the valve stem. I guess the valve stem area is suppose to be the heaviest spot on the rim and the yellow dot is the light spot on the tire. Is this correct?

Thing that i dont understand is the weights put on by the factory is close to the valve stem. So if the valve stem area is suppose to be the heaviest then why are the weights placed by it? Maybe it wasnt ballanced right from the factory cause im seeing the steel cords in the tire where the weights are located on the rim. The rest of the tire still has rubber on it.

BTW im having a shop ballance the new tire...im just trying to learn and understand.

My main concern is mounting the new tire on the rim correctly. Any tips would be great!
 

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moved this to the correct forum
 

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The dot could be the heavy OR the light side of the tire, it depends on manufacturer. The tire is heavy in one spot because that's where the belts overlap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I ordered the Bridgestone Battlax BT016. I got the universal tire instead of the OE replacement. I heard on another site that the universal was better. Dunno if theres any differences or not.

Ive looked at a couple sites that talk about bridgestone tires. One was car tires and the other was motorcycle tires. They both said the yellow dot is the light spot on the tire.

I found the yellow dot on my worn tire... its inline with the valve stem.

Should i have my wheel balanced to see where the heavy spot actually is or just put the dot inline with the stem?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
well if u have access like i do to a auto shop that have a standard tire changer u can acutually use that just beware of the chances of scratching ur rims up but other than that it is very easy to put tires on that way - or u can do the hand method but it is very hard to break that bead.
Im doing it by hand..... thats why i bought the tire irons and rim protectors. Breaking the bead is easy when you weigh 230lbs.
 

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Tires

I used to buy all the race take offs I could and sell them for $150 installed. I had a bead breaker, and a static balancer. I used a 30 gallon drum with the lid off and a rubber hose around it to set the tire on and use tire spoons to remove the tire from the rim. I have a little over $300 invested in tools. I hear to tell you it was a lot of work to change tires and I always ended up scratching the outer edge of the rims with the tire spoons/irons. If you good you can keep rotating the tire on the rim and filling up with air to balance the tire with little or no weights.

Bead breaker
http://www.jcwhitney.com/Motorcycle-Tire-Bead-Breakers/600015594.jcw

Tire balancer
http://www.nomartirechanger.com/product/show/9?gclid=CNHWsfWcxZsCFR0SagodmmWhBA
 

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I'm a believer in doing it yourself but without the right tools changing tires is a lot of work and the wheels are very easy to scratch. If you're already taking the wheel in to be balanced, which I think is a good idea I'd spend the extra 10 - 15 bucks and have them mount the tire too. just my .02
 

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As far as I know Bridgestone marks the light spot of the tire but I thought they used a red dot, anyway they say to put the balance dot next the the valve stem because that is assumed to be the heavy point of the wheel. You can pull all the weights off the wheel and then have the bare wheel checked for balance to find the heavy spot then align the dot with that point. Tires are getting so good these days some people actually balance the bare wheel and when they have to do a tire change it requires little or no weight and is quick to balance. I just installed a set of PR2's for a friend that had no marks on the tires and took less than 1/2 ounce to balance.

Be sure to use a good bead lube when you remove and install your tires and don't force them. The first bead should go on without using tools. You don't want to hear any tearing sounds coming from the bead when you're applying pressure with the spoon. Sometimes you just have to put some pressure on them and wait or help it along with your hand.
 

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i am a auto tech and a tire tech the yellow dots depending on the company means light side and the red dots mean heavy side, but i have seen tires with 8 dots on one side all the same color do not worry about the dot if it makes you feel better put the yellow dot oposite side of the valve stem and have it balanced, should be no prob, ive done a million tires and never had a problem balanceing a motorcycle tire no matter where the dots where located. i believe that suspension gooroo has very good info earlier in this thread.
 

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I think it depends on the manufacturer.

My Michelins didn't even have a dot.

In the future you may want to balance them at home to save more money. Plus that way, if put the dot on the wrong side and you have to add a lot of weight you can rotate the tire 180 on the rim to fix it.

Edit: Just a little tip, warm tires are your friend. Let them sit out in the sun for a while to make them more pliable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
i am a auto tech and a tire tech the yellow dots depending on the company means light side and the red dots mean heavy side, but i have seen tires with 8 dots on one side all the same color do not worry about the dot if it makes you feel better put the yellow dot oposite side of the valve stem and have it balanced, should be no prob, ive done a million tires and never had a problem balanceing a motorcycle tire no matter where the dots where located. i believe that suspension gooroo has very good info earlier in this thread.

While i was reading about dots on bridgestone tires i came across the red dot. Its the location of the high spot on the tire. Your suppose to match it with the low spot on the wheel.



I might have the shop find the heavy spot on my wheel before i put the new tire on. The factory had to put 2 large weights to balance it out. So im guessing that the valve stem is not the heaviest spot on my rear wheel.
 

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Yellow dot

So does anyone else have any imput on the balancing yellow dot or do i know all i need to know about the yellow dot?
It does not matter where you put the tire the object is to use the least amount of wheel weights as possible. So like I said I have spent time moving the tire around on the wheel until I find the right spot. The dot on the tire is where you are supposed to line it up with the valve stem that is what it is for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
It does not matter where you put the tire the object is to use the least amount of wheel weights as possible. So like I said I have spent time moving the tire around on the wheel until I find the right spot. The dot on the tire is where you are supposed to line it up with the valve stem that is what it is for.

Thanks for the tip... Like your saying... I want to use the least amount of weights. So if the yellow dot is the lightest spot on the tire then wouldnt i want to line it up with the heaviest spot on the wheel to balance it out? Doing it this way would allow me to use the least amount of weight.

Ive read that the valve stem area is usually the heaviest part of the wheel... I dont think thats the case with my rear wheel. On mine you have the valve stem then you have a spoke then the 2 heavy weights. If the valve stem area is the heaviest then shouldnt the weights be placed on the opposite side of the valve stem?

Im not trying to make this hard.... just wanna get it right the first time.


Edit: Well i talked to the guy thats gonna balance my tire and he said just mount the yellow dot inline with the valve stem. I told him where the weights were on my tire... he said he sees my point but not to waste my money by finding the heavy spot on the rim... So i guess thats how ill mount the tire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well got my tire changed. The old one came off with no problems. The new tire took a few tries to get it on but it finally went. No scratches on the edge of the rim thanks to the wheel protectors. I did however scratch the flat part of the wheel when i was removing the wheel from the bike. I got in a lil bit of a hurry and the brake caliper scratched it.

So, are the factory rims powder coated or painted? Hopefully they are painted...i have a buddy that paints cars for GM and he will hook me up.

Also the rear brake isnt working as good as it was before. I pumped the rear brake before i went riding. At first i thought maybe i got soap on the rotor... I was out riding for at least 3 hours so you would think if there was anything on the pads or rotors it would of worn off by now. Should i try bleeding the rear brake?
 
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