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Discussion Starter #1
Okay so I have been having some problems getting the front wheel up in second gear using the clutch & in need of some advice or tips or something. Here's a quick run down of what I do. So I ride in second till about 6k rpm pull the clutch with two fingers, bury the throttle & dump the clutch the wheel comes up about a foot & sits right back down took a video with the go pro & when I give it gas the Rpms are hitting like 11k, 12k but for some reason I still can't get that thing up. Bike is a 05 gsxr 750 and mods are yoshi exhaust with pc5 & is geared -1 front + 2 in back. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Live Fast Die FUN
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Nothing is WRONG with general chat.

We do how ever have a stunt section on this forum. Youll notice its a very not busy section as its not really out thing here. What Mike was saying is its polite to make a intro thread in the New Members section before just expecting answers.

Enjoy the site, Ill move this to the stunt section. I will say....its not the bike...its you. That bike will wheelie EASILY with those mods.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I didn't say it's the bike that's why I'm asking for help lol & it's chat forum i don't need to tell you about who I am or post pictures of my bike. To be able to ask a question??
 

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You don't have to post an intro, but I've found it tends to help show that you're here for more than just a quick answer and bailing.

Members will be more inclined to help out and answer questions you may have if they know more about you: riding time, skill set, etc.

It's like walking up to a golf course and asking how to drive 400 yards without even saying hi or giving info. Seems a little greedy. But that's all my opinion so it doesn't matter anyway.

Im sure someone will come and tell you how to wheelie.

Thumb smashed on my Galaxy Note 4
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Still doesn't make sense but okay I'll take your advice. Been riding since 2014 summer. Been almost across the states from North Carolina to Texas. Like track days but would rather just ride through the mountains. Bikes 05 750 & 15 1k
 

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See, that wasn't so bad lol.

For me, it's more of not seeing posts like "just picked up my first bike, it's a 600 and I've been riding for a week, how do I wheelie and drag a knee at 90 mph?"

What's your body position like when trying to get the wheel up? Forward in the saddle or back? Are you keeping the throttle open after the clutch dump or closing it back off? Is it maybe a mental block preventing you from pulling the front up more?

Thumb smashed on my Galaxy Note 4
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I would say probably more middle of the seat I usually ride all the way forward. So I am in fact sliding back a little but not to the point were I feel uncomfortable. & I am keeping the throttle on I have even tried revving it high & continuing to roll on & still nothing. & I don't think it's a mental thing I can get on my 1k & power it up in 3rd & not set it down till I want to. I just can't get the 750 up & I'm pretty sure it's something to do with my technique just haven't figured it out ha. Any more ideas on what it could be ? Thanks for the reply
 

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Hello,

At the expense of a little top-speed, I recommend either fitting a front sprocket with one-less-tooth on it, or replacing the rear sprocket with 4-5 more teeth.

This changes your gearing to promote a faster accelerating motor, & this means more access-able wheelie potential...

Alternatively, roll the throttle in 2nd up to 5,000 & then wind it on flat-out whilst moving back in your seat. Once in the air, you'll eventually find that nice balance point, where everything feels comfortable.

You should be able to hold-her-up at that point for quite a while, though it gets more difficult to hold-up once the front wheel stops rotating, & the gyroscopic effect is lost.

Good luck, & I hope it doesn't cost you too much cash to learn how to master this. Often spending a week-end on a powerful dirt-bike learning the feat is much cheaper, safer, & arguably more fun.

When all else fails, a GSXR-1000 might be what you need, as your body weight / mass / distribution may not agree with the 750.

Cheers,

Rastus
 

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It might be something with your technique. Especially if you are used to power wheelies. I only recommend power wheelies for people to get used to the feeling of weightlessness, I don't recommend it get used to clutching up wheelies, because it is much more violent. When powering up a wheelie, it comes up smooth, and at a reasonable slow and stable pace, and if you ever need to go down, you just back off the throttle a little and it rolls down smooth. Clutch wheelies, are a whole different monster. They fly up fast, threaten to throw you over, if you roll off the throttle you'll slam down hard on the ground, if you give it too much you'll go over, if you give it too little, you won't do anything. There is an art to clutch wheelie'ing. It is much more than just mashing on the throttle. I could let a 6 year old take my Buell out and throttle up a wheelie.

When you want to clutch up a wheelie, a good starting point for most bikes is around 40mph. Obviously depending on the size of the engine, weight of the bike, engine position, rider position, and tons of other factors, a little more or less speed may be necessary, but 40 is a good starting point. It is fast enough on most bikes to give you a decent rpm at which to make enough torque to get the wheel up in 2nd, without being so fast that you are scared to be on one wheel. Much lower than 40 on most bikes, you will have more luck in 1st, and I've read countless threads that say to practice clutch wheelies in 1st. The best advice I can give you, DONT! Clutch wheelies in first are a lot harder to master, and a lot less forgiving than in 2nd. The torque multiplication from 1st to 2nd on my Buell is nearly double. It is not quite as drastic on my GSXR750, but the same principle applies. The lower your gear, the more torque, the faster the wheel comes up, the less control you have, the more small mistakes affect what the bike does, the more likely you are to get hurt, or hurt your bike.

The Technique: Get up to about 40mph or so (You can always adjust faster or slower later if needed), hold the throttle steady at 40mph (Do not speed up before the wheelie! This will take away from the pace at which your rear wheel changes speed, making it more difficult to get the rear wheel going faster than the front!), pull the clutch in, and give the bike a very small amount of throttle AT THE SAME TIME as you aggressively "pop" the clutch. If you hold your hands out in front of you and pretend to do this, your left fingers should flick out at the same time your right wrist moves forwards. Pretend your left fingers, and right wrist are tied together. They need to move AT THE SAME TIME! Slowly increase the amount of throttle you give it until you reach your goal. DONT RUSH IT!!! I've seen tons of people ruin bikes and get hurt because "They are good riders, and they don't need to take their time". Take it from someone who has been doing this a long time, less is more! If it takes you several weeks to get this, GOOD! As long as you get it, and no one got hurt! It sounds like something your dad would say, but this is something that can seriously mess you up if you rush it. If you have given the bike 1/4 throttle and got the wheel up, but it still isn't comfortable, KEEP DOING IT!!! It's ok to repeat the same steps over and over until you are comfortable. Don't give the bike any more throttle just to "Look cool to your friends" or whatever. Just take it slow.

Steps in order:

1. 40mph.

2. Steady throttle.

3. Pull clutch in, and quickly release with a simultaneous shot of throttle (START SLOW!!!)

Once you have gotten used to this process, and are comfortable getting the wheel up some (Will likely take several days if you practice a few hours a day, less if you have an entire day or two to spend practicing), you may try moving your left foot to the back peg, and finding a stable position. This will move most of you bodily weight to the rear, and allow the front wheel to come up much easier. BUT!!! Make sure you start THE ENTIRE process over!!! 40 mph, tiny bit of throttle!!! Don't get used to giving it quarter throttle sitting down and expect standing up to give the same results!!! It will take half as much throttle or less to get the bike up once you put a foot back!!!! Make sure to always keep your right foot forward to cover the rear brake if you don't have a hand brake. 4 Cylinder engines run very smooth and don't create much engine braking force, so if you screw up and both feet are on the back pegs, you might not be able to bring the bike forward again, and may flip over backwards.

Good luck man!!! If you are still having trouble maybe shoot another video and post it up! Hope this helps!!!
 

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I saw that you said you use two fingers on the clutch, keep doing that. It is the best way. 1 finger can get sore, or not create enough force, any more than 2 and you risk losing grip on the throttle. One thing that will help is that the gsxr750 comes with a factory steering dampener, this will help you to keep the wheel straight when it's off the ground, which will stop you from getting "The Shakes". If you get the shakes at a fast enough speed, you will quickly lose your appetite for wheelies for the day lol.
 

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Did you ever figure this out. I have the same bike and have very similar issues throwing up the wheel. I'm sure I'm doing something wrong but everyone makes it seem so easy. I think it's my clutch cable or something. It doesn't pop like most other bikes


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I'm kinda curious as to how more then 2 fingers on the clutch causes you to loose grip on the throttle? Don't get me wrong, I only use 2 fingers all the time on the clutch buuuuuuut last time I checked the clutch was on the other side of the bike from the throttle and wouldn't effect my throttle grip.
 

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I'm kinda curious as to how more then 2 fingers on the clutch causes you to loose grip on the throttle? Don't get me wrong, I only use 2 fingers all the time on the clutch buuuuuuut last time I checked the clutch was on the other side of the bike from the throttle and wouldn't effect my throttle grip.

Ha ha! This is gold!
 

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You don't have to post an intro, but I've found it tends to help show that you're here for more than just a quick answer and bailing.

Members will be more inclined to help out and answer questions you may have if they know more about you: riding time, skill set, etc.

It's like walking up to a golf course and asking how to drive 400 yards without even saying hi or giving info. Seems a little greedy. But that's all my opinion so it doesn't matter anyway.

Im sure someone will come and tell you how to wheelie.

Thumb smashed on my Galaxy Note 4
If you want to drive 400yds just don't buy a Lada.
 

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I still can't reliably do a wheelie on my L2 600. I just installed the R6 throttle tube and that helped a little, but I think my biggest issue is my mind. I'm terrified of wrecking my bike, so I don't think I'm getting enough throttle on before dumping the clutch. I only weigh 150lbs so I kinda doubt that's the problem, regardless of where I sit.
 

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Live Fast Die FUN
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I'm kinda curious as to how more then 2 fingers on the clutch causes you to loose grip on the throttle? Don't get me wrong, I only use 2 fingers all the time on the clutch buuuuuuut last time I checked the clutch was on the other side of the bike from the throttle and wouldn't effect my throttle grip.
Thats nothing....dont get me started on the steering dampener comment.
 
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