Suzuki GSXR Forum banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,674 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As in 'reverse shifting'?
1 up; / 5 down?

It is a simple inversion?

When I tried to do it on my '97 R750- it had clearance issues with the fairing, and would have had to cut/modify it- hence- didn't do it on that bike.

Do you like it? I've read most all do- once used to it, etc.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,145 Posts
I originally tried GP shift in 2015 but would mis-shift at bad times like a 3rd gear WOT pass and go to second instead of fourth. That will kill a pass :0

Since I was going to attend a school and didn't want that distraction, I went back to conventional.
I realized that I missed it upshifting coming out of a corner. I was so much easier to just tap down then lift up in that situation.

I went to GP at the beginning of this season on the track and street GSXR, the main reason being that the quick shift I had was GP only. I would not go back, it is really the better pattern.

It still causes me issues occasionally as the other three bikes I ride are only standard shift. This last weekend I found myself upshifting 2 gears when I should have gone down 2. Again, not good out of the corner. On the flip side, I've GP shifted the DR650 on the street by mistake. Oh well, I still like it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I went to GP at the beginning of this season on the track and street GSXR, the main reason being that the quick shift I had was GP only. I would not go back, it is really the better pattern.

It still causes me issues occasionally as the other three bikes I ride are only standard shift. This last weekend I found myself upshifting 2 gears when I should have gone down 2. Again, not good out of the corner. On the flip side, I've GP shifted the DR650 on the street by mistake. Oh well, I still like it!
Switching between shift patterns regularly would absolutely drive me crazy lmao

Kudos to you for keeping your sanity
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,674 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I originally tried GP shift in 2015 but would mis-shift at bad times like a 3rd gear WOT pass and go to second instead of fourth. That will kill a pass :0

Since I was going to attend a school and didn't want that distraction, I went back to conventional.
I realized that I missed it upshifting coming out of a corner. I was so much easier to just tap down then lift up in that situation.

I went to GP at the beginning of this season on the track and street GSXR, the main reason being that the quick shift I had was GP only. I would not go back, it is really the better pattern.

It still causes me issues occasionally as the other three bikes I ride are only standard shift. This last weekend I found myself upshifting 2 gears when I should have gone down 2. Again, not good out of the corner. On the flip side, I've GP shifted the DR650 on the street by mistake. Oh well, I still like it!
Thanks John, I wanted to heat/read from someone who had done it, etc.
So, it's as easy as repositioning the linkage- right?
I'm thinking I'm going to try it soon.

Gotta start now- remember Todd- I down, 5 up!! Crap, already went old school; 1 UP, 5 DOWN!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,854 Posts
If you're street riding where you don't get close to scraping your pegs or foot, it's not even needed.
It's only beneficial on track when trying to upshift in a corner.
There's maybe one corner at each track where you really benefit.
I found it difficult to count my downshifts, when normally I could downshift lightning fast pushing down. Seldom do I ever need multiple fast shits up.

I went back to conventional.
It's all preference. I mentioned before there were some of the best racers in the world who used conventional
Kevin Schwantz
Mick Doohan and many more. :0001136745-huh:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Todd_Sails

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
If you're street riding where you don't get close to scraping your pegs or foot, it's not even needed.
It's only beneficial on track when trying to upshift in a corner.
There's maybe one corner at each track where you really benefit.
I found it difficult to count my downshifts, when normally I could downshift lightning fast pushing down. Seldom do I ever need multiple fast shits up.

I went back to conventional.
It's all preference. I mentioned before there were some of the best racers in the world who used conventional
Kevin Schwantz
Mick Doohan and many more.
Totally agreed

I find myself requiring very rapid downshifts, 3 per second is usually the max, much more often than fast up shifts.

But I have lots of friends who run GP because it feels better to them, which is always a good thing.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,145 Posts
Thanks John, I wanted to heat/read from someone who had done it, etc.
So, it's as easy as repositioning the linkage- right?
I'm thinking I'm going to try it soon.

Gotta start now- remember Todd- I down, 5 up!! Crap, already went old school; 1 UP, 5 DOWN!
It was very easy on my K6 750. Just take the shift arm off the engine, flip it 180 degrees and put it back on. Getting the pinch bolt in from the correct side is tight on some bikes. Then just adjust the shift lever. Nothing that can't be easily reversed if you don't like it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Todd_Sails

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
I have done it before for shits and giggles, but based on my experience of it I see little point for it on a street bike. I could see it being justified if you had a GP-shift track bike and wanted to get yourself into the routine of shifting the same way on every bike so that no mishaps occurred.
Just put it on whatever shift pattern feels right for you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Todd_Sails

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,674 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I have done it before for shits and giggles, but based on my experience of it I see little point for it on a street bike. I could see it being justified if you had a GP-shift track bike and wanted to get yourself into the routine of shifting the same way on every bike so that no mishaps occurred.
Just put it on whatever shift pattern feels right for you.
Well, I DO have to K5's, and depending on how things go after the cosmetic rebuild this winter- a track bike is not out of the question.

Thanks everyone for the replies!!

I don't NEED to do it for the street, for sure- but I want to give it a good try- I just think I'd end up liking it better :0001136745-huh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
Well, I DO have to K5's, and depending on how things go after the cosmetic rebuild this winter- a track bike is not out of the question.

Thanks everyone for the replies!!

I don't NEED to do it for the street, for sure- but I want to give it a good try- I just think I'd end up liking it better :0001136745-huh:
The last thing you need is to try to ride a 1000cc as a track bike. If you ever want to do track, buy yourself a 300, 650, 600.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,674 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Oh Right, what was I thinking?

A Ruckus,

maybe a grom.

Or, my old CL100 I rode when I was 15 y/o.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
Oh Right, what was I thinking?

A Ruckus,

maybe a grom.

Or, my old CL100 I rode when I was 15 y/o.
Nope, just not a liter bike. You got yourself in trouble on the road at low RPM and severely injured yourself, so you're going to have a very bad time when you're riding at higher speeds and higher RPM, in a much more aggressive manner. Overestimating your own abilities is one of the best ways to hurt yourself, and a liter bike is not exactly a forgiving vehicle.
I highly doubt that you want to bin your bike a second time, and I'm just trying to look after you, so there's no real reason to feel offended.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,674 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Nope, just not a liter bike. You got yourself in trouble on the road at low RPM and severely injured yourself, so you're going to have a very bad time when you're riding at higher speeds and higher RPM, in a much more aggressive manner. Overestimating your own abilities is one of the best ways to hurt yourself, and a liter bike is not exactly a forgiving vehicle.
I highly doubt that you want to bin your bike a second time, and I'm just trying to look after you, so there's no real reason to feel offended.
Well Nick, I DIDNT get myself in trouble at low rpms or speeds. That was the problem.
I WAS riding WAY to aggressively for a corner I did not know, that leveled off after a slight uphill, and had woods on each side you couldn't see around. I distinctly recall stating I f'up up, and had crashed a bike for the first time in over 45 years- in traffic or not.
The logical way to get aggressive on a corner is to have ridden it before, and know what to expect, etc.- as you would on a track. Again- my one crash in all these years- was my fault, I wasn't using any of my riding skills I have built on all these years.

I'm not going to take all the time to recap what happened that morning that lead up to my crash- many factors- none of which were about gravel however.
I didn't overestimate my abilities- I totally disregarded sane riding guidelines on that corner- I paid for it.

Maybe you can make our trip to Deals Gap- I think it will be in May '18?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Had tried the GP arrangement on an RF900 a few years back. Did it out of curiosity and have to say that I liked it. Switched back because j found myself going back to the conventional way whenever I was in an emergency situation and intuition/habit kicked in and ended up shifting in the wrong "direction".


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
The last thing you need is to try to ride a 1000cc as a track bike. If you ever want to do track, buy yourself a 300, 650, 600.
Instead of buying a second bike, i just took my 1000 out to the track and didn't regret it at all. On my second track day I switched the shifting over to GP. On the track I didn't have a problem but going back onto the road my old habits kicked in

(I commute on moto almost daily)

However just reminding myself and visualizing my action before I took it, on the road, and my problems were fixed within a day or two.

Then it was tricky riding my buddies bike with regular shifting.

no way in heck I would ever switch back. I find upshifting in GP mode to be much more of a sure thing, and for me, it's much easier to upshift on the track while in a corner.

Like anything in life, it just takes a little practice.

I dont' understand why people say don't take a liter bike to the track. Sure, you can get into more trouble, but you also don't have to ream the teets off of her on the straights. You can short shift and guess what, you dont' even have to open the throttle all the way.

If you don't open the throttle all the way, then your liter bike acts like any lesser powered motorcycle.

If you can't control your throttle, then there are other issues at play.

It's like saying you shouldn't take a Z06 out for your first track day in a car, start with a miata? NO fuck that. I have a Z06 not a miata, I'm taking the Z06 out. And it was great, and you don't have to ream the teets of of that. I don't rev it to 7000 RPMs on every straight, i shift short, why ream the car when I'm not even racing and still learning?

Now in a 95 Firebird CMC race car... go ahead and run into the rev limiter. Replacing an LT1 is a whole 'nother prospect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
Instead of buying a second bike, i just took my 1000 out to the track and didn't regret it at all. On my second track day I switched the shifting over to GP. On the track I didn't have a problem but going back onto the road my old habits kicked in

(I commute on moto almost daily)

However just reminding myself and visualizing my action before I took it, on the road, and my problems were fixed within a day or two.

Then it was tricky riding my buddies bike with regular shifting.

no way in heck I would ever switch back. I find upshifting in GP mode to be much more of a sure thing, and for me, it's much easier to upshift on the track while in a corner.

Like anything in life, it just takes a little practice.

I dont' understand why people say don't take a liter bike to the track. Sure, you can get into more trouble, but you also don't have to ream the teets off of her on the straights. You can short shift and guess what, you dont' even have to open the throttle all the way.

If you don't open the throttle all the way, then your liter bike acts like any lesser powered motorcycle.

If you can't control your throttle, then there are other issues at play.

It's like saying you shouldn't take a Z06 out for your first track day in a car, start with a miata? NO fuck that. I have a Z06 not a miata, I'm taking the Z06 out. And it was great, and you don't have to ream the teets of of that. I don't rev it to 7000 RPMs on every straight, i shift short, why ream the car when I'm not even racing and still learning?

Now in a 95 Firebird CMC race car... go ahead and run into the rev limiter. Replacing an LT1 is a whole 'nother prospect.
Not opening the throttle all the way is NOTHING like having a smaller bike. A liter bike at 3-4K RPM makes more torque than a 600 does at peak. Also, the weight and handling is different.

Same thing for a car versus a motorcycle, they’re entirely different things. You have a lot more forgiveness in a car. But, learning how to ride fast on a 600 is going to be easier, because it’s more forgiving. Put-putting around the track getting lapped by 300s doesn’t mean that the 1000cc was suddenly a good idea.
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top