Suzuki GSXR Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
2008 gsxr750
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I aircraft stripped my tank down to bare metal, i took a brass brush and buffed out everything to be perfect and snooth and washed the tank. First coat of paint “spray” is bubbling and idk wtf the issue is. Any help
295896
295897
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,887 Posts
Looks like possibly silicone contamination.
 

·
Premium Member
1995 GSX-R 750
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
Without a doubt, the surface is contaminated with something. I would start over. Use a better primer, and paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
After you clean everything off, sand your entire tank with 400 grit sandpaper so that the paint has something to bite/stick to. You also need to clean it with something like lacquer thinner on a lint-free cloth as final wipe down to get rid of any surface contaminants (like natural oils from your fingers) before painting. Also, pickup some cheese cloth, also known as tack cloth, to wipe off any dust that settles on the surface.

Are you using a primer? If not I recommend using one. And what kind of paint are you using? I ask because with a fuel tank there is always the chance for fuel to drip on it when filling up, and gas will make standard rattle can paint crinkle and shrivel up.

I painted my bikes in two different types of paint with great success.

1st way was to use standard rustoleum paint and primer, but final coat was with spraymax 2k gloss clear (2 coats). The 2k clear is a catalyzed clear that is oil and gas resistant and super glossy just like regular automotive clear. This was done on the hi vis orange/hi vis yellow bike. This is like a base coat/clear coat style. FYI, a white basecoat makes bright colors pop more.

2nd way was my frame and swingarm on my streetbike, the brown/white/red bike. I painted the frame gloss black. This time I used Eastwood 2k gloss chassis black because I wanted a single stage instead of a base/clear. It's also a 2k catalyzed paint that is oil and gas resistant. I also used their catalyzed epoxy primer in black.

My process was basically the same for both projects. Started with washing the parts with a good degreaser like dawn dish soap.

Orange bike
1. Sand with 400 grit
2. Clean with lacquer thinner wipe down
3. Tack cloth wipe down
4. 2 coats of primer, 10 mins between coats
5. Let flash for 10 mins then 1 coat of white
6. Let flash 10 minutes then 2 coats of color. Allow 10 minutes between coats.
7. 2 coats of 2k Spraymax clear with about 10 minutes between coats.


Streetbike Frame
1. Sand with 400 grit
2. Lacquer thinner wipe down
3. Tack cloth wipe down
4. 2 coats of Eastwood black epoxy primer with about 10 mins between coats
5. 2 coats of Eastwood gloss chassis black with about 10 mins between coats. Important note is that with epoxy primer you have up to 72 or 96 hours or so to paint over it without sanding. Any longer and you will have to sand it before applying your topcoat in order to make sure it bonds well to the primer. Check the recoat windows for whatever products you use.

In order to get a good finished product the prep is the key. The actual painting is the fastest part. And you dont need a booth for nice finish. I painted mine outside on my back porch. And watch some youtube videos. There are lots of good one on there that will teach you good technique that are posted by pro painters. And dont try to paint heavy coats right away. That was the hardest thing for me to stay disciplined on. First coat is light and won't give full coverage. You'll hear them mention it in the YouTube tutorials.

The biggest thing is be careful spraying catalyzed paints. They have some strong and dangerous VOCs in them compared to standard spraybombs. I did it outside and bought a respirator from Home Depot that is made to filter out those kinds of chemicals so you dont breathe that crap in.

Screenshot_20201021-195748_Gallery.jpg

Screenshot_20210504-174814_Gallery.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
641 Posts
Fisheyes and silicone contamination makes sense but I've never seen it so bad. Might you have been spraying something in the vicinity that went onto the tank? Or was there something in the wash water?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
I agree. I paint alot and you have definitely got some contamination. I did see in your post what you used to paint it. Rattle cans or spray gun. If rattle cans is what you are using then after your final wash wipe it down with laquer thinner or alcohol. Then tack rag it and use a primer. If you are using a spray gun then use a filter in the line. Because you will get oily condensation in the tank that will blow through and mess up the paint. Also wear gloves and agreed on using a 2k clear or gas will damage the finish. A great spray can 2k is called spray max 2k and it sprays nice and they are about 25.00 a can on average. Painting is a bitch and not that easy or everyone would paint. There is alot more to it then people think. But yes the magic is usually in the prep. Bad prep bad job. Sometimes you do all the right things and still get a bad reaction. Your working with chemicals that can be sensitive. Good luck hope you get it looking good. I only paint with spray guns now. But I have shot good jobs with rattle cans.
295910
295911
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top